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How to detect weed seeds

Cannabis seeds 101: How to grow marijuana from seed

Cannabis is grown from one of two sources: a seed or a clone. Seeds carry genetic information from two parent plants and can express many different combinations of traits: some from the mother, some from the father, and some traits from both.

In commercial cannabis production, generally, growers will plant many seeds of one strain and choose the best plant. They will then take clones from that individual plant, which allows for consistent genetics for mass production.

If cannabis is legal in your state, you can buy seeds or clones from a local dispensary, or online through various seed banks.

Cannabis seeds vs. clones

For the typical homegrower, it may be easier to obtain cannabis seeds rather than clones. Growing from seed can produce a stronger plant with more solid genetics.

Plants grown from seed can be more hearty as young plants when compared to clones, mainly because seeds have a strong taproot. You can plant seeds directly into an outdoor garden in early spring, even in cool, wet climates.

If growing outside, some growers prefer to germinate seeds inside because they are delicate in the beginning stages of growth. Indoors, you can give weed seedlings supplemental light to help them along, and then transplant them outside when big enough.

Most seeds that you will buy are regular seeds as described above, but here are a couple more types.

How weed seeds work

Cannabis can be either male or female—also called “dioecious”—but only females produce the buds we all know and love. For reproduction, males have pollen sacs and pollinate females, causing female flowers to produce seeds.

Once cannabis seeds are mature, the female plant begins to die, and seeds are either dropped to the ground where they grow into new cannabis plants next spring, or the seeds are harvested for processing into seed oil or food products, or stored so they can be sown in the ground later and become the next generation of plants.

To get the buds found in medical and recreational stores, female cannabis plants are grown in an environment without males—or the males are removed from the area before they release pollen—so the females don’t create seeds. Females can then focus their energies on producing buds and not seeds—this high-potency marijuana is traditionally known as “sinsemilla,” meaning “seedless.”

Some varieties of cannabis can produce male parts alongside female flowers on the same plant, especially if exposed to environmental stressors. These plants are known as hermaphrodites, and sometimes they can self-pollinate to create seeds.

Pros and cons of using cannabis seeds

Check out Johanna’s full video series on how to grow weed on Leafly’s YouTube .

If buying from a reputable breeder or seed bank, growing from seed is the best way to ensure your plants will have solid genetics and start clean, meaning they won’t come with diseases or pests.

Also, buying from a reputable breeder or seed bank will give you a sense of what a particular strain will look and smell like, how it will grow, and how much it will yield at harvest.

The main drawback to growing from seed is there is no guarantee as to what you’ll end up with—if you buy a regular pack of cannabis seeds, it will be a mix of males and females. You’ll need to sex them out (more below) to identify the males and get rid of them, because you don’t want your females producing seeds.

Sexing marijuana plants can be a time-consuming process, and if you don’t catch males, there is a risk that even one males can pollinate your entire crop, causing all of your female weed plants to produce seeds.

One way to avoid sexing plants is to buy feminized seeds (more below), which ensures every seed you plant will be a bud-producing female.

You can also minimize headaches and avoid the hassle of seed germination and sexing plants by starting with clones.

How weed clones work

Aside from producing cannabis through seeds, or sexual reproduction, you can also reproduce the plant through cloning, or asexual reproduction. A clone is a cutting that is genetically identical to the plant it was taken from—that plant is known as the “mother.”

Pros and cons of using cannabis clones

Through cloning, you can create a new harvest with exact replicas of your favorite plant. Because genetics are identical, a clone will give you a plant with the same characteristics as the mother, such as flavor, cannabinoid profile, yield, grow time, etc. So if you come across a specific strain or phenotype you really like, you might want to clone it to reproduce more buds that have the same effects and characteristics.

With cloning, you don’t have to get new seeds every time you want to grow another plant—you just take a cutting of the old plant—and you don’t have to germinate seeds or sex them out and get rid of the males.

One drawback of clones is they need to be taken during the vegetative stage of a plant—flower is too late—so if you have a small setup with only one light, it can be hard to keep clones alive while flowering other plants, because the two need different amounts of light.

Another drawback to clones is they can take on negative traits from the mother plant as well. If the mother has a disease, attracts pests, or grows weak branches, its clones will probably have the same issues.

Additionally, every long-time grower will tell you that clones degrade over time.

What are feminized cannabis seeds?

Feminized cannabis seeds will produce only female plants for getting buds, so there is no need to remove males or worry about female plants getting pollinated. Feminized seeds are produced by causing the monoecious condition in a female cannabis plant—the resulting seeds are nearly identical to the self-pollinated female parent, as only one set of genes is present.

This is sometimes referred to as “cloning by seed” and will not produce any male plants. This is achieved through several methods:

  • By spraying the plant with a solution of colloidal silver, a liquid containing tiny particles of silver
  • Through a method known as rodelization, in which a female plant pushed past maturity can pollinate another female
  • Spraying seeds with gibberellic acid, a hormone that triggers germination (this is much less common)

Most experienced or commercial growers will not use feminized seeds because they only contain one set of genes, and these should never be used for breeding purposes. However, a lot of beginning growers start with feminized seeds because they eliminate the worry of having to deal with male plants.

Top feminized cannabis strain families

A lot of classic weed strains that have been around for a while come in feminized form. Some popular fem seeds are:

  • OG Kush
  • Haze
  • Afghan
  • GSC (Cookies)
  • Skunk
  • Cheese
  • Gelato

What are autoflowering cannabis seeds?

Autoflowering seeds are also popular with beginning growers. They are easy to grow because you don’t have to worry about light cycles and how much light a plant receives.

Most cannabis plants begin flowering when the amount of light they receive on a daily basis reduces. Outdoors, this happens when the sun starts setting earlier in the day as the season turns from summer to autumn. Indoor growers can control when a plant flowers by reducing the daily amount of light plants receive from 18 hours to 12 hours.

However, a type of cannabis called Cannabis ruderalis, which developed in extreme northern conditions without much sunlight, will begin flowering once the plant reaches a certain age—they automatically start flowering regardless of the amount of light they receive, hence the name “autoflower.”

Pros and cons of growing autoflower

Because they grow and flower quicker, growers can fit in multiple autoflower cannabis harvests into the span of one regular harvest.

Autoflowers can be started in early spring and will flower during the longest days of summer, taking advantage of high quality light to get bigger yields. Or, if you get a late start in the growing season, you can start autoflowers in May or June and harvest in the fall.

Also, autoflower plants are small—perfect for closet grows or any small grow, or growing outdoors where you don’t want your neighbors to see what you’re up to.

A couple big drawbacks, though: Autoflower strains are known for being less potent. Also, because they are small in stature, they usually don’t produce big yields.

However, potency in autoflowering varieties has increased significantly since their initial introduction, with some breeders crossbreeding the low-THC ruderalis with other more potent varieties.

Tips for growing autoflower marijuana seeds

Autoflowering strains require some preparation, as they will grow quickly and start to flower whether or not you’re ready for them.

Climate considerations

Many marijuana growers start autoflowers early in the season, and at a different time than a regular crop, so keep the season and climate in mind when growing and harvesting—your plants still need warmth to grow, and rain can give them bud rot. Consider growing in a greenhouse to protect them.

Training plants

Because training happens during vegetative growth, for autoflowering plants, this period could be as short as a few weeks, which means time is limited. Try topping your autoflowers after they have three nodes, and stop once they begin to flower. You will want to prune them lightly.

Go easy on nutrients

Autoflowers don’t need lots of nutrients because they’re small and don’t spend much time in the vegetative cycle. They won’t need as much veg nutrients—such as nitrogen—but will need more bloom nutrients.

What are high-CBD cannabis seeds?

CBD, or cannabidiol, is one of the chemical components—known collectively as cannabinoids—found in the cannabis plant. Over the years, humans have selected plants for high-THC content, making cannabis with high levels of CBD rare. The genetic pathways through which THC is synthesized by the plant are different than those for CBD production.

Cannabis used for hemp production has been selected for other traits, including a low THC content, so as to comply with the 2018 Farm Bill. Consequently, many varieties of hemp produce significant quantities of CBD.

As interest in CBD as a medicine has grown, many breeders have crossed high-CBD hemp with cannabis. These strains have little or no THC, 1:1 ratios of THC and CBD, or some have a high-THC content along with significant amounts of CBD (3% or more).

Seeds for these varieties are now widely available online and through dispensaries. It should be noted, however, that any plant grown from these seeds is not guaranteed to produce high levels of CBD, as it takes many years to create a seed line that produces consistent results. A grower looking to produce cannabis with a certain THC to CBD ratio will need to grow from a tested and proven clone or seed.

How to germinate marijuana seeds

Germination is the process in which a seed sprouts and begins to grow into a new plant. Also referred to as “popping,” germination is the very first step in starting your weed grow.

Marijuana seeds can be acquired from an array of sources and can vary in quality. For more info on how to buy marijuana seeds, check out our Guide to buying cannabis seeds.

Cannabis seeds require three things to germinate: water, heat, and air. There are many methods to germinate seeds, but for the most common and simplest method, you will need:

  • Two clean plates
  • Four paper towels
  • Seeds
  • Distilled water

Step 1

Take four sheets of paper towels and soak them with distilled water. The towels should be soaked but shouldn’t have excess water running off.

Step 2

Take two of the paper towels and place them on a plate. Then, place the marijuana seeds at least an inch apart from each other and cover them with the remaining two water-soaked paper towels.

Step 3

To create a dark, protected space, take another plate and flip it over to cover the seeds, like a dome.

Step 4

Make sure the area the seeds are in is warm, somewhere between 70-85°F.

After completing these steps, it’s time to wait. Check the paper towels once a day to make sure they’re still saturated, and if they are losing moisture, apply more water to keep the seeds happy.

Some seeds germinate very rapidly while others can take a while, but generally, seeds should germinate in 3-10 days. If it’s been two weeks and a seed hasn’t sprouted, it’s probably a dud and won’t sprout.

A seed has germinated once the seed splits and a single sprout appears. The sprout is the taproot, which will become the main stem of the plant, and seeing it is a sign of successful germination.

It’s important to keep the delicate seed sterile, so don’t touch the seed or taproot as it begins to split.

Transplanting germinated cannabis seeds

Once you see the taproot, it’s time to transfer your germinated seed into its growing medium, such as soil.

  • Fill a 4-inch or one-gallon pot with loose, airy potting soil
  • Water the soil before you put the seed in; it should be wet but not drenched
  • Poke a hole in the soil with a pen or pencil—the rule of thumb is: make the hole twice as deep as the seed is wide
  • Using a pair of tweezers, gently place the seed in the hole with the taproot facing down
  • Lightly cover it with soil

Keep a close eye on the temperature and moisture level of the soil to keep the seed happy. It’s very delicate at this stage. Use a spray bottle to water it—over-watering can suffocate and kill the delicate sprout.

Within a week or so you should see a seedling begin to grow from the soil.

Germinating cannabis seeds doesn’t always go as planned. Some seeds will be duds. Others will be slow and take longer to sprout. But some will pop quickly and grow rapidly.

This is the beauty of seeds—often, you can tell which plants or genetics will thrive right from the get-go. This will help you determine which plants you want to take cuttings from for clones or for breeding if you want to create a seed bank of your own.

How to sex a pot plant

Check out Johanna’s full video series on how to grow weed on Leafly’s YouTube .

As we’ve mentioned, cannabis is a dioecious plant, meaning male and female reproductive organs appear on different plants.

Because only female cannabis plants produce buds and you want them to focus all their energy on producing buds and not seeds, it’s important to identify and get rid of male weed plants so they don’t pollinate females. If females are pollinated, it will give you buds filled with seeds, making your weed harsh and unpleasant.

Cultivating males is important for breeders trying to cross new strains and genetics, but most people growing for buds will want to remove the males.

As mentioned above, you can skip the processing of sexing weed plants by growing with feminized seeds or clones.

If growing male and female cannabis seeds, they’ll start to show their sex organs, or “pre-flowers,” after 8-10 weeks from germination.

Cannabis plant sex organs appear on nodes, the points where branches grow off from the main stalk.

Males will have round balls—these will develop into pollen sacs, which will release pollen into the air when mature.

Females will have a round structure with long hairs—these hairs will develop into pistils, which will catch pollen in the air.

Pre-flowers can initially be extremely small and hard to identify with the naked eye, but you can use a magnifying glass to get a better look.

Can I grow a seed I found in a bag of weed?

Finding a cannabis seed in your stash is not ideal, but we’ve all been there before. Although much less common than it once was, it still happens. Sometimes you’ll notice one when grinding down some flower, or you’ll see one pop, spark, and crackle from the heat of a lit bowl.

These are referred to as “bagseeds” and whether or not you can grow one will depend on where it came from.

Is a bagseed good or bad?

Seeds found in finished cannabis buds can develop for a number of reasons. For example, a male plant may have accidentally pollinated a flowering female during the growing process. But more commonly, they’re a sign of stress and can be attributed to high temperatures during the final stages of flowering or an exaggerated spike in climate or environment.

Seeds can also form in plants with genetic disorders or instability, like hermaphrodites—plants that develop both male and female reproductive parts. Generally, stress and genetic disorders are viewed as bad, so temper expectations with any plant you start from a bagseed.

But sometimes you get lucky and find a mature seed in some really nice herb. Strains like the legendary Chemdog wouldn’t be possible without adventurous smokers planting and proliferating the seeds they found in a bag of kind bud.

So don’t discount bud because it has a seed or two in it. While not ideal, it could be the origins of the next great weed strain.

Ask yourself a few questions to decide if it’s worth the time and energy to grow the seed.

Was the seed found in good weed?

If you don’t like the flavor, effects, or even the look of the bud, then it’s probably not worth growing.

Are you ready to grow?

Growing marijuana takes a certain level of commitment: time, energy, and financial resources, so be sure you can commit to the whole process.

Is the seed viable?

For a seed to be viable, it must be mature enough to have a completely formed genetic blueprint, and it must be strong enough to germinate and pop through its hard casing and sprout its crucial taproot.

There are a few indicators that will give you a sense of whether the seed is worth germinating.

  • Tiger stripes—dark stripes on the seed which resemble veins on a leaf are generally good
  • Solid shell—a seed should be able to withstand a little pressure when pinched between your fingers; if it crumbles or cracks, it’s no good

Immature seeds tend to be light in color and have a soft outer shell.

In some cases, even if a seed isn’t completely mature, there’s still a chance it could be viable. But often these are extremely weak, take long to develop, and express other unfavorable characteristics. Growers usually discard weak plants to free up space.

You might also find a mature seed that has been physically damaged through poor handling, like rough trimming. In those cases, it probably isn’t worth the effort to try and germinate the seed.

But if the seed you found looks decent, you might as well germinate it and see what sprouts.

Time to germinate

Viable or not, there’s only one sure way to find out if a bagseed will grow. If you’re simply curious to learn and not as concerned with the overall outcome, you can plant a couple of bagseeds outside and see what happens.

If you’re ready for a more serious approach, make sure you have the space for a proper garden and pop the seeds to see what fruit they bear.

Even if your seed sprouts fast and grows vigorously, it still has roughly a 50/50 chance of being female and producing buds, instead of turning out to be a male.

Remember, once a seed germinates, the real work begins. Sexing, selecting, vegetative growth, flowering, and the eventual harvest all lie ahead.

How to buy cannabis seeds

Cannabis seeds can be found on numerous online seed banks, but note that it is illegal to bring seeds into the US and Customs will seize any cannabis seeds that they find in packages or on a person. In legal and medical states, you may purchase seeds at a dispensary.

A guide to buying cannabis seeds

The first couple months of the year is a great time to start planning your cannabis garden to get a head start on the outdoor growing season, which roughly runs from March to November, depending on where you live.

Navigating the cannabis seed market can be challenging when states have different degrees of legality. This guide will answer your questions on buying seeds so you can be on your way to growing your own cannabis.

Is it legal to buy marijuana seeds?

Marijuana seeds are considered a cannabis product just like flower, edibles, and concentrates. Their legality depends on which state you live in. People living in states with adult-use legalization can buy, produce, and sell seeds within their own state, but seeds can’t cross state lines. People living in states with medical marijuana legalization can only buy seeds if they have a medical card.

Seed banks exist outside of the US and can sell them for “souvenir purposes,” but it is illegal to bring seeds into the US and Customs will seize any cannabis seeds they find in packages or on a person.

Where can I buy cannabis seeds?

Many world-renowned seed banks are overseas in the Netherlands, the UK, Spain, and other countries where cannabis laws are less restricted. Seed banks provide seeds from a variety of different breeders.

In states with adult-use legalization or a medical marijuana program, you can buy seeds within your own state, either at a dispensary or through a specific seed company’s website.

Can you buy cannabis seeds online?

Before you purchase seeds online, you’ll need to figure out what strain you want to grow and what breeder you want to buy from.

Because US federal law still prohibits cannabis, it can be hard to find information on seed banks and breeders. Breeders who have a long history and positive reputation are usually a good place to start.

Check out our explainer and buying guide to cannabis seed banks for more info on buying seeds.

To get an idea of what well-established breeders look like, check out:

Europe

  • Sensi Seeds
  • DNA Genetics
  • Dinafem
  • Green House Seeds

US

  • Southern Humboldt Seed Collective
  • Exotic Genetix

You can also do some research and find an online grow journal that details the whole growing process of a specific strain from a particular breeder. Through these, you’ll be able to look over another grower’s specific notes and see pictures of the final results.

If you grow some seeds and like the results, try growing another strain from that same breeder and see how it goes.

Do dispensaries sell cannabis seeds?

Some dispensaries in medical and adult-use states sell seeds, but not all. Be sure to check or call ahead to see if they sell seeds. Buying marijuana seeds at the dispensary is far more straightforward, however, your options will be more limited than shopping online.

Dispensary staff should be able to give you information on the seeds they’re selling, but keep in mind that a lot of dispensaries focus on selling flower and end-products. It’s a good idea to call ahead and talk to staff to see if they are knowledgeable about seeds and can give you specific information on growing.

How to look for quality genetics when buying marijuana seeds

Breeders talk about “unstable genetics,” meaning that a seed’s origin is unknown. Make sure that when you buy a packet of seeds that it or the breeder who produced them can list where the seeds came from and how they were crossed and/or backcrossed to get the seed that you hold in your hand. If you can’t get a seed’s history, it could be anything and the result of poor breeding practices.

An inexperienced breeder might cross a male and a female one time and sell the resulting seeds as a new hybrid strain, but professional breeders usually put their strains through several rounds of backcrossing to stabilize the genetics and ensure consistent plants that reflect those genetics.

Which strain should I grow?

Even one weed plant can produce a lot of buds come harvest time, so make sure you grow a strain you like. Note strains you enjoy when you pick something up at the dispensary or smoke with friends, and look for seeds of it when you want to start growing.

Some strains are easier to grow than others because they are more resistant to mold and pests, so if you’re new to growing, you may want to try an easier strain to start.

Some strains also take longer to grow than others. Depending on whether you’re growing indoors or outdoors, you may want to grow a quicker marijuana strain if you live in a climate that get cold and wet early in the season. For example, indicas are known for having a shorter flowering time than sativas.

All of this information should be available to you when buying quality seeds.

What’s the difference between regular, feminized, and autoflower seeds?

Regular seeds

If you buy a packet of regular seeds, they’ll come with a mix of males and females. A lot of cultivators prefer to grow these because they haven’t been backcrossed—essentially inbred—as much as feminized or autoflower seeds. You’ll need to sex out the seeds once their reproductive organs show during the flowering phase and discard the males—because they don’t produce buds and will pollenate females, resulting in seeded flowers.

Feminized seeds

Seeds can come feminized, meaning you can just put them in soil and start growing for buds. These seeds are guaranteed to be bud-producing females and growing them cuts out the step of having to sex out plants and discard the males.

It also reduces the risk of having a stray male sneak into your crop—just one male can pollinate a huge crop, causing your females to focus their energies on producing seeds instead of buds.

Autoflower seeds

Autoflower plants change from the vegetative to flowering state with age, not the changing of their light cycle. They have a short grow-to-harvest time and can be ready to harvest in as little as 2 ½ to 3 months from when you put the seeds in the ground. The downside is that, typically, they are less potent, but autoflower seeds are great for people who want to grow cannabis but don’t want to spend a lot of time doing it.

How much do marijuana seeds cost?

Cannabis seeds usually come in a pack of 10 or 12 seeds and start at around $40 a pack and go up from there. Some high-end genetics can run between $200 to $500 a pack.

Feminized and autoflower seeds will cost more because more breeding work was put in to creating them and they take less time for the grower to get buds.

How many seeds should I buy? Are they all going to survive?

When you grow any amount of seeds, a percentage of them won’t germinate, even if you get them from a reputable breeder. Always count on a few not germinating or dying off, or roughly 1/4 of the total you put in the ground.

When growing regular seeds, some won’t germinate and some will have to be discarded because they’ll turn out to be males. With feminized seeds, some won’t germinate, but a higher percentage of them will turn into flowering plants because there won’t be any males.

If you want six total cannabis plants to harvest for buds and are growing from regular seeds, start with about 4 times as many, or 24 seeds. Some won’t germinate and some will turn out to be males, and then you’ll want to discard down to the six best phenotypes. If growing feminized seeds, you can probably start with about twice as many seeds in this case (about 12); a couple won’t germinate, and then discard down to the six best phenotypes.

Make sure to always stay within your state’s legal limit of growing plants.

How do I buy strain-specific cannabis seeds?

Strains like Blue Dream, Gelato, and Original Glue have gained in popularity in recent years. Check out these resources on how to buy these types of cannabis seeds:

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Ecsd seeds

ECSD x DSD

Here you can find all info about ECSD x DSD from Ganja Rebel Seeds. If you are searching for information about ECSD x DSD from Ganja Rebel Seeds, check out our Basic Infos or Lineage / Genealogy for this cannabis variety here at this page and follow the links to get even more information. If you have any personal experiences with growing or consuming this cannabis variety, please use the upload links to add them to the database!

Basic / Breeders Info

ECSD x DSD is an indica/sativa variety from Ganja Rebel Seeds and can be cultivated indoors (where the plants will need a flowering time of ±70 days ), outdoors and in the greenhouse. Ganja Rebel Seeds’ ECSD x DSD is a THC dominant variety and is/was never available as feminized seeds.

Ganja Rebel Seeds’ ECSD x DSD Description

The DSD brings down the flower time of the ECSD a bit and adds some nice colors and density to the buds. I grew a few of these in small pots to test with minimal care and nutrients. It produced some tasty dense buds with long spear shaped tops. Lot’s of variation and unique flavors. Certain phenos can finish quick and yield big. These two highly sough after statins combined offer a large spectrum of unique plants and serious quality.

Flowering Time: 9-11 weeks
Outdoor Harvest: Oct 7th – 21st
Environment: Indoor, Outdoor & Greenhouse
Genetics: East Coast Sour Diesel X Double Strawberry Diesel
Filial Generation: F1
Strain Type: Indica/Sativa hybrid

Where can I find real Sour Diesel seeds? (I have the clone alrd)

Are there any legit sources for Sour Diesel seeds yet? I have her in clone form but I want to see if I can find a little better pheono of her. Please let me know where you scored seemingly legit S.D. seeds.

Have you found a legit OG Kush seed breeder? Please list those too.

Well-Known Member
Bubba’s girl
Well-Known Member
Well-Known Member

The original would probably be best unless you pop hundreds of beans. I’ve grown countless packs of og kush seeds with few ever even comin close to the original clones.

Buddha Tahoe was alright but you have to search.
Wifi was alright but the flavor and potency wasn’t there.
I did find a nice og dominant out of charity og but still the original cut was better.
Docs og had nice og phenols but .

Most of what I mentioned are no longer available.

Well-Known Member
MistaRasta
Well-Known Member

@MeJuana
This is the best option. I’ve seen keepers come out of dr greenthumbs sour diesel that test well above 25%

I haven’t ran a lot of greenthumbs gear but I just got done going through his cookie s1’s and found a solid keeper.

Not sure about the ghost og, but I really want to order his headband as well. Looks straight Fire!

DoctorFrost
Well-Known Member

I have also heard good things about the ECSD from Dr Greenthumb, but have never grown anything from him. If you look at some of the other American breeders you will probably find some crosses that will have ECSD in them crossed to other Chem crosses where you will more then likely find straight ECSD phenos. Check out Top Dawg seeds , he just got back into the game and should be coming out with a lot of crosses here soon. He supposedly has the best of the best when it comes to Chems, and ECSD should fall into that category too. I actually bet you will find something more to your liking with Top Dawg then GreenThumb but I am not saying that is for sure.

As for an OG, instead of trying to find one that is exactly the same as a clone that you might have.. why not check out something new that could give you something slightly different but possibly better? Check out Bodhi’s OG Crosses such as Goji OG, Sky Lotus, Lotus Larry, Cheech Wizzard, etc. Personally I’d give Goji a go, everyone loves her and I have never heard a bad thing about that strain. Have only grown one so far myself but it is a keeper. Very very potent stuff with many people having their phenos tested at over 25%. And it isn’t like you have to search through 100’s of seeds to find keepers either. You will probably find many keepers in a single pack.

MeJuana
Well-Known Member

Thanks guys. East Coast Sour Diesel is listed as 50/50 strain but I am going to order it anyway. Might try some of their OG Kush crosses too. I am about to shut down until late September then I will be doing 1/2 Sour D from clone and 1/2 from Dr. Greenthumb. I might order from a second breeder and do 1/3rd comparative grow off.

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Weed gone to seed because left out too long

Do Cannabis Seeds Go Bad?

M any pot fans are starting to look into growing their own supply. After all, how hard can it be? Nature does it all the time, and it doesn’t even have any grow light options other than the sun. While you may not be producing showroom quality nugs, there’s a pride that comes with tending to your own garden and snipping buds straight off the branch. Plus, you can’t beat the price.

Plenty of online stores sell seeds so it’s pretty easy to pick your favorite strains to start. However, if it’s been a while since your seeds arrived and they’re not yet planted, you can forgive yourself for wondering if maybe you’ve waited too long. After all, how long do marijuana seeds last? Whether you are a cannabis fan who has just begun growing a couple of plants recreationally, or you are looking to test your green thumb for the first time, there is one question that’s going to come up at some point.

Do Marijuana Seeds Go Bad?

First off, marijuana seeds are the same as many other plant’s seeds. A waxy outer shell called the seed coat protects the embryonic shoot, stem, and root contained within, which are nourished by a nutrient-rich oil surrounding them. As long as the shell remains intact and the plant inside doesn’t dry out or get damaged, your seed can still grow into a cannabis plant.

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However, this shell will not last forever. Once it dries out and hardens the seed coat can crack and expose the embryonic plant to damage. Or the seed coat hardens to the point that it no longer lets in moisture. In both cases, the seed is no longer viable.

Of course, there is some debate in the cannabis community over how long do marijuana seeds last. Some growers claim that when stored in the ideal conditions, marijuana seeds can last anywhere from six months to a year after packing and still spout once placed in the soil. Other producers believe that marijuana seeds can last up to a decade if properly refrigerated in the right containers.

Most seed producers agree that on average three to six years is a maximum for viability, and every day that the seed is stored drops the chances of it germinating just a little bit.

So how long do marijuana seeds last? In general, six months is the maximum if you’re looking for a nearly 100% germination rate. After three years, you’re looking at a germination rate of around 50%.

What constitutes “ideal conditions” for cannabis seed storage also depends on the genetics of that particular plant. Some cannabis strains produce a much hardier, longer-lasting marijuana seed that can last for years and still stretch their leaves once planted. Others produce seeds that need to quickly return to the soil.

How Marijuana Seeds Are Stored

In terms of long term storage for your marijuana seeds, there are four main factors to consider:

When it comes to how long marijuana seeds last, temperature is the main factor. In nature, heat tells the seed that winter’s over and it’s time to start sprouting. If your marijuana seed’s not in the soil, this means that the plant matter inside the marijuana seed will begin to germinate and then rot.

41 degrees Fahrenheit (5 degrees Celsius) is the absolute warmest you want your storage spot to be, with the sweet spot being somewhere around 38 degrees Fahrenheit.

If you are refrigerating your marijuana seeds, they’ll last the longest in a separate unit or a spot near the back. Every time you open your fridge you are changing the temperature which can harm the seeds over time.

Humidity

Humidity is also your enemy when it comes to how long your marijuana seeds will last. When a seed gets wet, it cracks open to allow the sprout and root out. This will let in rot if the seed isn’t planted. A humidity level of about 5% is the maximum you want to allow.

Light

Much like heat and humidity, light tells that seed to wake up because it’s time to spring forth.

In order to keep your seeds from going bad, it’s best to keep them stored in a dark container in order to avoid light. photo credit

By keeping your seeds in a dark or opaque container, they’ll keep dozing long term. Light can also damage the surface of the marijuana seed, which in turn will damage what’s stored underneath, causing your marijuana seed to go bad.

Besides being dark, for your marijuana seeds to last long term, you want to expose them to as little oxygen and carbon dioxide as possible. These gasses are what growing plants breathe, as well as the pests that consume them. If you’re refrigerating or freezing your marijuana seeds, make sure your container is as airtight as possible. If you can vacuum seal them, even better.

Alternatively, if you’re planning on planting in the next few months, regular mailing envelopes will do in a pinch. They’ll keep the marijuana seeds out of the light and dry, so all you have to do is store them in a cool place. Plus, envelopes make it easy to label your strains so that you can keep them separate.

How To Tell If Your Marijuana Seeds Are Still Healthy?

What should you do if you find some old seeds and have no idea how long they were stored? Maybe past you put them in a freezer bag in the hopes of keeping your favorite strain alive, or found a couple at the bottom of a baggie that the trimmer missed.

How do you know if your marijuana seed has gone bad, or if it’s healthy and viable to grow into a plant? There are four easy ways to check if your marijuana seed is still good.

Dark Color

If your seeds are dark brown, black, or gray, that’s a very good sign. The shell is intact and uncompromised, which means the genetic material inside has been kept safe.

Seeds should have a dark color. If seeds are still green they are probably not ready yet. photo credit

Viable seeds should also have stripes or spots all the way around. If the seeds are white or green, they’re most likely still immature.

Waxy Coating

Check if the seed still has a waxy coating. A healthy seed should have a slight sheen to it, as though it’s been oiled. This means the seed still can retain moisture.

Hard Shell

If the seed is still healthy, you should be able to lightly squeeze it without it crunching between your fingers. If the shell has no give and splits or splinters under light pressure, then your marijuana seed has gone bad and has no chance in the soil.

Cracks or Holes

If there are any cracks or holes anywhere on the shell, your marijuana seed’s likely gone bad and will most likely not sprout. Bacteria and other harmful lifeforms can find their way into the seed, or it will dry out.

The True Test of a Cannabis Seed

Of course, the best way to test whether your seeds will sprout is to plant them and see. If some green shoots climb their way out of the soil after a couple of days or weeks, you’ve got your answer.

Storing marijuana seeds is a great way to make sure you always have your favorite strains on hand, as well as to keep yourself stocked up on plants for the long haul. Luckily, marijuana seeds can last for years as long as you make sure your seeds are cool, dry, airtight, and out of sight. There’s no better time than now to learn a new skill, so let’s see how green your thumb can get.

How Do You Tell If a Seed is Good or Bad?

If the seed is dark with stripes or spots all the way around, has a waxy shell that doesn’t crack when you give it a light squeeze, and doesn’t have any visible cracks or holes, it’s probably still good. If there are holes in the shell, it’s dry, or especially pale, your marijuana seed’s probably gone bad.

Do Autoflower Seeds Go Bad?

All marijuana seeds can go bad, including autoflower seeds. However, by keeping your seeds at a stable 38 degrees Fahrenheit and at around 5% humidity, as well as airtight and out of the light, your seeds may last up to 5 years or more.

How do you like to store your seeds? Share your thoughts in the comments!

Author

Paul Barach is a Seattle-based freelance writer, editor, and author with experience creating well-researched, edited web articles covering cannabis news, culture, history and science. Paul is a regular contributor to PotGuide and has also contributed to publications such as Medium.com, SlabMechanix, Litro, and The Trek. He prefers to spend his free time outdoors and most recently hiked the Pacific Crest Trail. So far he has only fallen into the La Brea Tarpits once. You can follow him on Instagram @BarachOutdoors and stay up to date professionally through his LinkedIn page.

How to prevent the death of cannabis seeds and seedlings

Every grower, almost without exception, will have occasionally suffered the death of a plant during cultivation, just when it seemed that everything was going along nicely. In this article, we’ll focus on the main reasons why seeds may not germinate properly, or why seedlings may end up dead in the first weeks of life.

Seeds dying before germination

Cannabis seeds can die even before we start to grow them, in which case, when the grower comes to germinate them, they won’t open up and sprout at all.

The seeds of the cannabis plant, like many other types of seeds, must always be kept in the correct conditions, especially if you want to save the leftover seeds for later use and ensure that they germinate well in the future.

The same goes for unopened whole packs of seeds that have been purchased to store for later use. Sometimes, certain varieties are in high demand and there is limited stock, so the more astute growers will make sure they grab a few packs to keep in the vault until they find the time to germinate the cannabis seeds.

Cannabis seeds must be stored in the correct conditions

What to do with leftover seeds or unopened seed packs

Cannabis seeds need very low relative humidity and relatively low temperature for their proper storage, so the best plan is to keep them in a “no frost” refrigerator, in which both the humidity and temperature are maintained at very low levels for better conservation of food.

If we want to keep a seed package that’s still sealed, simply put the whole unopened pack into the fridge. The best place for its conservation is usually the small shelf where the eggs or butter are kept, although really any part of the fridge is ideal for storage.

If we want to save the leftover seeds from a pack for later use, we recommend storing them in the original Eppendorf tube or container used by the bank. In the original packaging, these Eppendorf tubes hold the seeds and usually also contain a few small silica gel balls, included to maintain very low humidity (10 to 20%) and help to ensure that the seed does not lose any germination viability.

If, however, we leave the seeds for a long period of time in any corner of the house it is possible that over time their viability to germinate will decrease, and when we plant them they may take a long time to germinate or indeed not germinate at all. it is also important to protect them from sunlight.

So if you wish to save the seeds in the best conditions, always keep them in the refrigerator, well protected from air, light and moisture.

How do we store leftover seeds to grow at a later date?

Death during the germination of cannabis seeds

Death during the germination of cannabis seeds is one of the most frequent failures suffered by every grower over the course of his or her cultivation career. There are several possible reasons that can lead to the seeds dying before they even open and begin to grow, which we’ll examine here.

Not all seeds have the same resistance to the errors that may occur during the germination process. Just as not all siblings are not all equal, neither are all seeds. By this, we mean that in the case of one seed germinating and the rest of them not doing so, it doesn’t necessarily mean that those that didn’t germinate were not strong or resistant, but simply that they were less so than the one that did germinate. If this occurs, we must ask ourselves why they did not germinate and look for any possible failings in the process.

Death by drowning the seed during germination

We start from the basic premise that the seeds require moisture, oxygen and a suitable temperature for germination; If one of the three aspects is not taken into account, it is quite likely that the seeds won’t end up germinating.

Putting the cannabis seeds in a glass of water and waiting 24 to 48 hours for their germination can be a fatal error for them. Re-hydrating the seeds in water is a good idea as long as they are not out of contact with the air for long, as they will be deprived of oxygen and most of the time they will end up dying; so if we use this method, we only leave them to re-to hydrate in water for a few minutes, although, preferably we will avoid any previous soaking or re-hydration (which in any case is not necessary).

We must maintain suitable levels of humidity for germination

The reason for this is that tap water contains chlorine, which sterilises the water to make it suitable for domestic use. However, this chlorine disappears by evaporation after a few hours, so if the water then gets contaminated, the seed can be attacked by any number of pathogens and eventually die. This example also illustrates why we must always touch the seeds with clean hands; If the seeds are handled with dirty fingers, it can lead a fungal or bacterial infection to contaminate them and severely compromise their development.

The same can happen in other germination media such as jiffy plugs, where the most common mistake is usually not draining away the excess water after re-hydrating the compressed peat. To this error, we can add that of burying the seed at more than twice its own depth, in which case it may not emerge despite having germinated perfectly well, but instead, simply end up rotting due to excess water and lack of oxygen. This error is also frequent in growers who germinate directly in the soil because when they first irrigate, the seed can be washed down into the soil resulting in them being buried too deeply, which makes it difficult for the seedling to reach the surface. It is always better to wet the substrate first, before sowing any seeds.

If you want to sow the seed directly into the soil and do it properly, when growing outdoors you must also act to prevent seed predators. Ants, birds, and many other animals or insects are another common cause of seed failure during germination. In the case of ants, they eat the small, delicate root, leaving the plant unable to develop and condemning it to imminent death.

Placing the seeds between moist serviettes/paper towels is one of the best germination methods for beginner growers. Since you can easily see if the seed has taken root or not. But we must also bear in mind that the germination medium, the kitchen paper, is made of cellulose, meaning it is an organic material that will decompose and rot, just like any product of this type.

Planting the germinated seed is also a crucial moment

It is, therefore, obligatory to change the napkins every day and a half, more or less, to avoid the seeds being contaminated by the pathogens that can appear as the napkins begin to rot. For this reason, we recommend placing the napkins in a deep plate and covering it with another one, leaving a small gap between the two so that air can enter, oxygenate the microclimate that is created during the germination of the seeds and avoiding them rotting.

Seeds dying due to lack of moisture

Just as excess water is one of the most common causes of germination problems, the lack of moisture is equally detrimental to the process.

If outdoor temperatures are around 20 to 24ºC, then we shouldn’t need do much more than start the seeds to germinate and wait for them to open, following the precautions already discussed. But in case of having warmer or cooler temperatures, we must act to raise or lower the environmental temperature for optimal germination, and find the best location for germination to be successful.

If it is winter, the plates holding the seeds are often placed on top of a low heat source to raise the temperature. We must, however, be careful: if this heat source emits hot air, the paper towels will dry out and the seeds will run out of moisture, affecting germination. If you realise this in time, you can re-hydrate the seeds and they will usually recover from and continue to germinate, although it is also possible that there will be consequences that may affect the subsequent development of the plant during its cultivation.

Not long after sowing the seed, we will see our little plant emerge from the soil

If we haven’t noticed soon enough that the seeds have been left without moisture, we can assume that they will have dried up completely, with their consequent death, and this is even more likely if the seeds had already opened up to show the root. This can also happen very easily if we germinate during summer when temperatures are high and humidity is usually very low compared to other times of the year.

Death of the plants during the growth period

The start of the growth period is a very important stage in a plant’s life, so several aspects must be taken into account so that it does not die of any of a number of causes.

One of the most frequent problems is root rot due to excess irrigation and lack of oxygen in the substrate. Up till now, this has been one of the most common causes of plant death during the growth period, especially with beginner gardeners who lack previous cultivation experience. In addition, the likelihood of this happening increases considerably in crops with auto-flowering varieties; we’ll explain what to do here.

When the plant emerges from the substrate, leaving behind its germination stage, it is crucial to take care with any excess water and the lack of humidity in its aerial parts such as leaves, stems and branches.

The proper conditions guarantee good germinación

When the plant is young and only has a very small root, its needs are few, it feeds and drinks very little. If we saturate the substrate with too much water, apart from halting the growth of the root (leading to little or no growth in the aerial parts), it creates the ideal conditions for the small roots to slowly rot. If the plant loses a part or all of its tiny root system in its first stage of life, it is almost guaranteed that it will die within a few days.

If we use a small 0.5L to 1L plant pot for the first part of vegetative growth, before transplanting them to a bigger pot, we will be covering our backs in case of any excess of irrigation, since the substrate will dry out again much faster than in larger pots. For this reason, this issue is very common for novice growers who are cultivating auto-flowering cannabis plants, where the use of 20L pots is recommended from the start.

It is often said that you must irrigate with an appropriate amount of water and nutrients for the size of the plant. As this is often complicated to carry out, as a rough guide we can irrigate the plants with an amount not more than 10 or 20% of the plant pot’s capacity. So, if they are 1L pots we will water from 100 to 200ml as long as it is not an auto-flowering plant.

If the plan is to grow automatic varieties, then during the first two weeks we water with 100 to 350ml per irrigation, every 1 or 2 days. Remember that the substrate must maintain a minimum of humidity to allow the plant to feed and continue to develop normally. If it is raining and the plants are outdoors, it’s a good idea to move or cover them, to prevent the substrate from getting soaked, which could easily lead to root zone problems.

The first stages of growth survived with success!

We hope that this information will be useful and help to stop your seeds and seedlings dying. Don’t hesitate to leave any comments or questions, we’ll be pleased to help.

The articles published by Alchimiaweb, S.L. are reserved for adult clients only. We would like to remind our customers that cannabis seeds are not listed in the European Community catalogue. They are products intended for genetic conservation and collecting, in no case for cultivation. In some countries it is strictly forbidden to germinate cannabis seeds, other than those authorised by the European Union. We recommend our customers not to infringe the law in any way, we are not responsible for their use.

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How to tell if you have female weed seeds

How to Identify a Female Marijuana Seed

Ask any experienced grower how to produce a hardy marijuana plant and they will say to start with a seed for a good strain. Lighting, soil, nutrients, and water play large roles in the final yield, but starting with a high-quality seed gives growers the best genetics with the highest potential yield possible. Most people find their first seed mixed in with marijuana, but most of these seeds are low quality and may grow to be male plants. The best way to get high-quality seeds is to purchase them from a reputable marijuana seed retailer.

Characteristics of a Quality Marijuana Seed

Quality marijuana seeds have specific characteristics that set them apart. Unfortunately, they can be difficult for consumers to find since most growers avoid seed production in their plants at all costs. Even when a rogue seed is present, it rarely grows mature enough to germinate. Though it is challenging to identify a quality seed for even the most experienced growers, it is vital to be able to do so when using seeds to grow marijuana. Below is an overview of the characteristics of a high-quality seed.

Appearance

There are several visual indicators that can give a person an idea about the quality of a marijuana seed. Some details are easy to spot while others take a higher level of scrutiny.

Color

A high-quality marijuana seed has a dark color, typically a shade of brown, grey, or black. It should have tiger-like stripes or spots on the entire surface of the seed. If the seed is green or white, it is immature and is not likely to germinate. In the rare circumstance that an immature seed germinates, it takes much longer than it would for a mature seed.

Coating

Good quality marijuana seeds have a waxy coating around the shell. This is easy to see if the seed is held up to the light because the shell will have a slight sheen.

Size & Shape

The largest seeds are the best ones to grow. It is easier to pick the largest ones if there are several to compare side by side. Growers should look for the most symmetrical seed that is round or shaped slightly like a teardrop. Underdeveloped seeds are small and have an asymmetrical shape.

A lot of information can be gleaned from the texture and hardness of a marijuana seed. After visually inspecting the seeds, growers can pick them up and feel their shell for the following:

Cracks

Poor quality seeds have weak shells that are damaged easily. These seeds will have cracks or splits on them that expose the inside. The best seeds have a smooth exterior with few anomalies.

Hard Shell

A mature, high-quality marijuana seed has a hard shell that can withstand the pressure of being squeezed between two fingers. Poor quality seeds will disintegrate when squeezed. If this happens, the seed was weak or dead and would not have grown a viable plant if it germinated at all.

How to Determine the Quality of a Marijuana Seed

While seeing and feeling a marijuana seed can give growers a lot of information, it is not always accurate. Even the best-looking seeds can be duds, especially if they have been frozen. Below are a few things growers can do to better determine the quality of their seeds.

Germinate the Seed

The most obvious thing a person can do to show seed quality is to germinate the seed. If the seed sprouts within 5 days, it is a viable seed. It will still take time to find out if the plant will be male or female and whether the strain is high quality.

How to Germinate a Marijuana Seed

The traditional way to germinate a seed is to bury it one-quarter inch deep in moist soil and watch it closely for a sprout. A freshly germinated seed has a very fragile root that is easily damaged when the seed is transplanted. This method allows the seed to germinate without root interference.

Another common way to germinate marijuana seeds is by wetting a folded paper towel or cotton pad and placing the seeds inside of it. It is important not to get the paper towel or cotton pad too wet or it could drown the seeds. Growers should check the seeds after a few days to see which have taken root.

Perform a Float Test

The float test is a more scientific approach to determining the quality of a seed. The test involves filling a drinking glass with spring or distilled water and placing the seeds inside of it. Allow the seeds to soak for one to two hours before determining quality.

After the time has passed, seeds that float can be considered poor quality and discarded. Seeds that have sunk to the bottom of the glass are healthy, high-quality seeds. Once the test is complete, the seeds need to be germinated right away. Their shells will be soft from soaking in the water and will not survive storage.

Source Them Well

The simplest way for growers to ensure they have high-quality seeds is by sourcing them from a reputable seed bank. These companies specialize in breeding a variety of marijuana strains and producing seeds that, with the right care, grow into viable, high-yielding plants. Growers can choose a variety that meets their requirements for potency and desired effects and be sure they are getting seeds that produce the plant they want.

Using an Online Marijuana Seed Bank

Those who live in a state where marijuana is legal for medical or recreational use can sometimes find seeds at their local dispensary. However, online marijuana seed banks have significantly more strains available. Even individuals who live in some states where marijuana has not been made legal to use can purchase seeds online. Several states consider dormant seeds to be souvenirs, so it is legal to purchase and own the seeds as long as they don’t become high-THC plants.

Do Marijuana Seeds Expire?

Many growers who have numerous marijuana seeds need to store them long term if they want to germinate them in the future. However, seeds need to be kept in specific conditions to remain viable. They should be stored in a cool, dark, and dry room, much like the environment in which growers dry their harvested marijuana.

Germinating Old Seeds

Seeds can remain viable for three to ten years if stored properly, but more and more seeds will fail to germinate as time passes. Older seeds will take more time to germinate, so growers should use the float test before assuming the viability of their stored seeds. They can speed germination by soaking the viable seeds in water mixed with a few drops of hydrogen peroxide for 24 hours. It is important to watch them closely for signs of opening, as they will need to be removed immediately to avoid drowning.

Can You Tell if a Marijuana Seed is Female?

Cannabis enthusiasts have been trying to find out how to determine the sex of a marijuana plant by the seed for ages. Unfortunately, there is no way to tell if the seed will produce a male or female plant by just looking at the seed. Regular marijuana seeds have a 50% chance of being female, so out ten seeds, growers can expect that 5 of them will probably produce female plants.

What Does a Male Cannabis Plant Look Like?

When growing marijuana, it is important to identify male plants as early as possible. Just one male plant can pollinate an entire field, so it is critical that male plants are removed before they develop pollen sacs. There are certain signs that a young marijuana plant is male, including the following:

Preflowers

Preflowers are the earliest sign of a marijuana plant’s gender. Between four and six weeks, nodes will develop at the joint where a plant’s stem meets the stalk. Female plants develop white hairs at the internodal joints while male plants develop rounded internodal sacs that fill with pollen.

While it is best to identify male marijuana plants by their pollen sacs as soon as possible to avoid accidental pollination, there is another way to determine a plant’s sex. If male and female seeds are planted at the same time, the male plants will grow faster and taller than the female plants. Additionally, male plants have longer stems with fewer leaves, making them look spindly compared to female plants.

Final Thoughts

Quality seeds are not often found in the bottom of a bag of dried marijuana, but there are ways for growers to ensure they are getting the best seeds available. With a keen eye and a reputable seed bank like i49.net, growers will have hardy, high-yield plants that make them proud of their hard work. Seed banks provide quality marijuana seeds in a variety of strains not typically available from other sources, and many of them can guarantee that the seeds will be feminized and thus produce female plants.

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    How to Identify a Female Marijuana Seed 15 March, 2020 How to Identify a Quality Marijuana Seed Ask any e. Read Article

    Hydrogen Peroxide and Cannabis 1 May, 2020 The Benefits of Hydrogen Peroxide in Hydroponics a. Read Article

    How to Speed Up Flowering of Outdoor Cannabis Plants 2 April, 2020 A good deal of cannabis horticulturists grow their. Read Article

    Can You Tell the Sex of Cannabis Seeds from Their Appearance

    Of all the things that can trip a grower up, sexing marijuana plants may just be the trickiest. Sexing plants is so important because growers are typically after the female plants, that produce the huge THC covered buds. Or the medicinal relief that CBD strains can bring. With such opposite effects of male and female plants, it’s easy to see just how important sexing plants is. But what if growers didn’t have to wait to sex their plants? While it would certainly make life easier, is sexing cannabis seeds possible?

    Can you determine the sex of cannabis seeds?

    This has been a question that has become a very hot topic online these days. After a quick search, growers can find multiple charts and explanations on how to sex cannabis seeds.

    Unfortunately, there’s not much truth to any of these interpretations. It’s simply impossible to tell just by looking at them what the sex of any cannabis seed is. If it was that easy, feminized marijuana seeds would not be as popular as they are. People could simply buy regular seeds and look at them themselves.

    Typically, marijuana plants cannot be sexed until they have already begun to grow. Cannabis seeds will look somewhat identical and plants in the vegetative stage will also look identical,. As the plants move into their flowering stage, they will start to show very clear signs as to what sex they are. While it would be much more convenient for growers to be able to determine sex before this point. The sad truth is that it’s just not possible.

    So where do all the myths from sexing cannabis seeds come from?

    Common myths on identifying the sex of a cannabis seed

    One of the biggest myths of sexing cannabis seeds comes from a popular chart online.

    The chart states that one can determine the sex of a cannabis seed by just looking at them. Within the chart, five cannabis seeds are shown. Three of these are female and two are male, supposedly. This chart says to look for a crater at the bottom of the seed. It explains that females will have a depression that is perfectly round. While males will have a crater that is misshapen and not uniform. However, this is simply not true. The craters found in cannabis seeds have nothing to do with the sex of a seed.

    This same chart states that females will also roll easily across a table or surface, while males will not. While it does say that a magnifying glass and pair of tweezers is needed to examine the seeds. neither of these tools will make it any easier to determine the sex of cannabis seeds.

    While growers may not be able to determine the sex of a seed, does the environment have anything to do with it? This is something else that has been hotly contested online.

    Environment determines sex debate

    We know that determining the sex of cannabis seeds cannot be done. However, it’s unclear as to whether environmental factors have any place in determining the sex of marijuana plants.

    Research is carried out all the time to determine if a plant’s environment has anything to do with the sex it will turn out to be. And while there’s research stating that it does not, there’s just as much research stating that certain species do have their sex determined by the environment. This same research also states that using certain chemical treatments can also reverse the sex of a plant.

    While environmental factors may not necessarily determine the sex of marijuana plants or cannabis seeds, it is known that certain environments can change the sex of a plant.

    This will mostly happen when a plant is stressed by its environment. When this happens, the plant may think it’s going to die and as a result, will change itself into a hermaphrodite plant. By doing so, it will be able to self-pollinate itself and survive.

    Growers know that hermaphrodite plants can be just as harmful to crops as male plants. Therefore, it’s very important that every grower understand how to sex marijuana plants. Particularly if they’re not using feminized marijuana seeds that will give them only females.

    While it would be much easier for growers to be able to sex their cannabis seeds, the simple fact is that there’s no way to do it. However, sexing plants early on during their growth period is not only essential, it’s completely possible. Growers can even do it before their plants enter the flowering stage if needed. Then male plants can be removed and growers can enjoy a nice, full crop.

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Anslinger seeds

Outlawing Marihuana

On August 12, 1930, the Federal Bureau of Narcotics was created as an independent unit in the Treasury Department and Harry J. Anslinger was appointed the bureau’s first commissioner of narcotics by President Hoover.

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References

H. J. Anslinger and W. Oursler, The Murderers. The Story of the Narcotics Gangs ( New York: Farrar, Straus, 1961 ), p. 9.

Quoted in S. Meister, “Federal Narcotics Czar,” The Nation 190 (1960): 160.

D. T. Dickson, “Bureaucracy and Morality: An Organizational Perspective on a Moral Crusade,” Social Problems 16 (1968): 143–56.

U.S. Bureau of Narcotics, Traffic in Opium and Other Drugs ( Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1934 ), p. 61.

Of the seventeen articles dealing with marihuana indexed in the Reader’s Guide to Periodical Literature from July 1937 to July 1939, ten acknowledged the help of the Bureau of Narcotics in supplying information (H. Becker, Outsiders [New York: The Free Press: 1963], p. 141).

H. J. Anslinger and C. R. Cooper, “Marihuana: Assassin of Youth,” American Magazine 124 (1937): 19.

Anslinger and Oursler, Murderers,p. 10.

D. Musto, “The Marihuana Tax Act of 1937,” Archives of General Psychiatry 26 (1972): 105.

A. Lander, “The International Drug Control System,” in Drug Use in America: Problem in Perspective ( Washington, D.C.: Washington, 1973 ), 3: 25.

Quoted in D. Musto, The American Disease ( New Haven: Yale University Press, 1973 ), p. 227.

Hearings before Committee on Ways and Means on H.R. 6385. House of Representatives, 75th Congress. 1st Session, 1937, p. 6.

E. Stanley, “Marihuana as a Developer of Criminals,” American Journal of Police Science 2 (1931): 252–61.

However, an 1895 text on pigeons states: “Hempseed, if sound and good, they are very fond of, and it is very beneficial at times, especially in cold weather, or given as a relish and not as regular food. It is, in fact, a stimulant, and to be so regarded. If a bird appear low-spirited, nothing will cheer it up more than a little good hempseed mixed with some dry raw rice” (quoted in W. M. Levi, The Pigeon [Sumter, S.: Levi Publishing Co., 1957] p. 450). Another text written in 1914 notes: “Hemp, sometimes recommended, is of use only as a pick-me-up in the case of a bird that happens to be out of sorts…” (quoted in Levi, The Pigeon,450). In 1912, Dr. Victor Robinson wrote about cannabis seeds: “Some birds consume them to excess which should lead us to suspect that these seeds tho they cannot intoxicate us, have a narcotic effect on the feathered creatures, making them dream of a happy birdland where there are no gilded cages, and where the men are gunless and the women hatless” (V. Robinson, “An Essay on Hasheesh; Including Observations and Experiments,” Medical Review of Reviews 18 [1912]: 162). In 1957, W. M. Levi, who during 1917–8 had been a first lieutenant in charge of the Pigeon Section, U.S. Signal Corps, and president of the Palmetto Pigeon Plant from 1923 to 1956, also referred to the effects of hemp seeds on pigeons: “In addition to the actual physical effect produced upon the bird’s body, its feeding has a decided beneficial psychological effect upon the bird’s happiness. Pigeons fed sparingly with a little hemp in the middle of the day during the moulting season take a new interest in life which is almost inconceivable” (Levi, The Pigeon,p. 499).

G. R. McCormack, “Marihuana,” Hygeia 15 (1937): 898–9.

Musto, American Disease,p. 228.

U.S., Congress, House, Congressional Record, 81st Cong., 1st sess., 1937, p. 5575.

Harry Anslinger: Sewing The Seeds of Prohibition

Ever wonder how the war on Marijuana first began and why? With Pot Prohibition finally on the edge of falling into the pages of history books, there are still many who have no idea how it all started, and more importantly WHO started it. Let’s go back to history and get to know a man named, Harry Anslinger, and his antagonistic role.

The roots of the movement were largely political and racial and had their beginnings in complex geopolitical events that resulted in two world wars and then the Cold one.

First targeted after WWI to undermine both India and Turkey’s agricultural products, both stigma and then formal prosecution for cultivation, possession and use of the drug were cynical tools wielded by people who sought to establish a “New World Order” for the last century.

In the United States, the main ringleader, for many decades, of this movement to ban the use of cannabis for any purpose, was a man by the name of Harry Anslinger.

Harry Anslinger: An Ardent Evangelist & Racist

Harry Anslinger was the nation’s first drug czar, appointed by President Hoover in the depths of the Depression. Described as a cross between Willliam Jennings Bryan and Reverend Jerry Falwell, he was first an ardent backer of alcohol prohibition who found himself out of a job after alcohol was re-legalized in the 1930’s.

His profile of the average toker of the time was that “most are Negroes, Hispanics, Filipinos, and entertainers. Their Satanic music, jazz, and swing result from marijuana use. This marijuana causes white women to seek sexual relations with Negroes, entertainers and any others.”

Using the mass media of the time, including the media empire of William Randolph Hurst of “Citizen Kane” fame, Harry Anslinger made marijuana prohibition his personal war on what he saw as the moral degeneracy of his day. This included not only extreme racist beliefs but also a personal antipathy to jazz.

From his powerful political pulpit, Anslinger was also perhaps the most influential person in the movement to ban all forms of cannabis and hemp production and use in the United States for a period of 30 years.

He was the first Commissioner of the U.S. Treasury Department Bureau of Narcotics from 1930 to 1962, and then the chief U.S. delegate to the international drug agencies until 1970.

As a result, his policies fundamentally shaped some of the worst and most repressive anti-cannabis policies both in the United States and globally.

A Drug War To Stamp Out Competition

Harry Anslinger also had other motives as his campaign rolled forward. Ostensibly his punitive policies had what seemed to be a laudable goal – preventing children from getting their hands on drugs. Yet he also opposed realistic drug education, including for teenagers, on the grounds that an understanding of the effects of cannabis, in particular, was the same thing as encouraging youth to try it for themselves.

From his powerful post in Washington, he elicited a powerful group of supporters – mostly politicians, who cast themselves as “ drug war warriors.”

In reality, however, what Anslinger and his supporters sought to achieve was not only social control but the creation of a safe haven for two emerging industries at the time which saw cannabis and hemp as direct threats to their commercial interests.

The first was eliminating the idea of marijuana as an effective natural medicine at a time when the corporate pharmaceutical industry was just realizing the impact of penicillin and other drugs.

However, the war did not stop here. Anslinger’s campaign was also targeted at banning the production of commercial hemp (introduced, albeit briefly by President Roosevelt to help struggling farmers in the South).

The reason? Hemp fiber was a considerable competition to the synthetics industry, at the time also gaining power in the United States.

Punishing Patients

One of the most long-standing impacts of Anslinger, beyond just harshly penalizing those who used pot as well as other narcotics, was the federal government’s punishment of patients who used narcotics it deemed “ unsuitable for medical purposes.”

Perhaps Anslinger’s most famous victim was the jazz singer Billie Holiday, who was singled out by Anslinger because of her race, gender and profession. He is credited for ruining her career. As Holiday wrote in her biography, Imagine if the government chased sick people with diabetes, put a tax on insulin and drove it into the black market…then sent them to jail .”

In effect, Holiday’s words, written about the refusal of authorities to get her treatment for a heroin addiction, became accurate reflections of what the federal government ended up doing to marijuana patients as the war against marijuana became more pronounced after Holiday’s death.

A Tortured Legacy

As the war on marijuana finally comes to a close, legalization reformers are in fact merely undoing the decades of active campaigning and propaganda first propagated by the work and crusade of one man.

And as marijuana, for both medical and recreational use, becomes legal in more and more states and countries, it is safe to say that there are few legacies more worth undoing.

Do you know other personalities responsible in pot prohibition?

Share what you know in the comments below!

Marguerite is an American expat. She has worked in digitalization of two industries (film and finance) for over 25 years as well as a professional journalist and writer. She lives in Frankfurt where she is also just finishing her Executive MBA at the Frankfurt School of Finance and Management, working as a freelancer and writing a medical marijuana/FinTech business plan. She published her first ebook on the pace of marijuana reform last year.

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Is it illegal to get weed seeds online

Can You Legally Buy Cannabis Seeds Online?

A substantial number of states allow medical marijuana, along with a growing number of places that have legalized recreational cannabis. The public is becoming more aware of the potential benefits of marijuana. People also realize that the damaging side effects of cannabis are often overstated, although some are real. Nonetheless, there is a softening in the stance towards the plant, which is even apparent on a political level.

As well as allowing people to use weed, an increasing number of states are relaxing restrictions on growing it at home.
You’ll need seeds to do so, but this is where it gets complicated for American residents in particular. Even if you live in California, where it is legal to grow cannabis at home, and purchase seeds from a Colorado-based seed bank, your package can STILL be confiscated.

Indeed, you could get in more trouble buying seeds from within the US than from an overseas country! This is the reason why most reputable seed banks that you hear about are located in Europe! This article delves deeper into the legality surrounding the purchase of cannabis seeds in the United States and offers tips to ensure you buy a high-quality product.

Marijuana Seeds Law

Cannabis remains a federally illegal substance in the United States. The plant’s seeds are also classified as cannabis, just like concentrate, flower, or edibles. As cannabis seeds are legal in certain states, seed banks operate within America’s borders. However, most of the best-known sellers operate in Canada or Europe. Let’s find out who can purchase seeds in the United States.

Is It Legal to Buy Cannabis Seeds Online in Any State?

As the nation’s cannabis laws state that the substance is federally illegal, it is technically against the law to buy, sell, or use it anywhere in the country. Indeed, the federal government could arrest someone for consuming cannabis if they so choose because federal law supersedes state law.

However, a majority of states allow medical marijuana, and a growing number permit adult-use cannabis. At present, the United States government has shown no indication that it wishes to interfere with a state’s right to legalize marijuana.

The current situation means you can legally get a cannabis seed from a dispensary in states where recreational cannabis is legal. In medical marijuana states, you’ll need to produce an MMJ card. Otherwise, you’re not allowed to purchase cannabis seeds.

Things are different online. It is illegal to transport cannabis seeds across state lines regardless of whether the plant is legal in both states. Therefore, you can only buy the seeds online if the seller is located within your state, and it is a location where adult-use marijuana is allowed.

Of course, you can take the risk of having your seeds confiscated by trying to order online anyway.

Is There Any Reputable American Seed Bank?

Although the United States is one of the world’s most progressive countries in marijuana legalization, the plant remains federally illegal. As long as this remains the case, users face all manner of complications. Ultimately, purchasing marijuana seeds online is only possible if you live in one of a select few states.

If you are concerned about legal issues, we recommend purchasing your seeds directly from a dispensary rather than buying them online. However, residents of Colorado should have no difficulties in theory. Stores such as The Farm and The Green Solution regularly advertise their online seed options. It should be a quick and easy process to buy them online if you are a resident of Colorado.

Elsewhere, it can be a matter of pot luck (pun intended). First and foremost, we can only recommend online seed purchases if you live in a state where growing marijuana at home is legal. If your package gets intercepted, you could face legal consequences, although this unfortunate situation is relatively rare.

You need a reputable seed bank capable of shipping to numerous states that understands the need for discretion. Such companies know how to package their goods to evade detection. If the seeds are confiscated, the firm will either send a new package for free or refund your money.

Which American Seeds Banks Are the Best?

California-based I Love Growing Marijuana (ILGM) is one of the most trustworthy seed sellers we have found in the United States. The website and store are run by Robert Bergman, who is an expert marijuana cultivator. He offers dozens of options and provides FREE shipping to customers in the United States and Europe.

Rocket Seeds is another American seed bank with a positive reputation. It operates out of the Bronx, New York, and is famed for its rapid shipping.

There are numerous Canadian seed banks known for selling excellent products. Noteworthy brands include Crop Seed Kings, MJSeeds, and Beaver Seeds.

Certain online marijuana seed sellers in the United States try to use subterfuge to ensure their customers receive the seeds.

It is possible to buy seeds from stores only if they are ‘used’ as luxury bird food or fishing bait additives.

In February 2015, one month after cannabis legalization went into effect in Washington D.C., the D.C. Cannabis Campaign organized a ‘seed sharing’ event in the country’s capital. As part of the new law, anyone aged 21+ who attended the event was legally allowed to receive an ounce of seeds. Unfortunately, the laws surrounding purchasing marijuana seeds online in the US have remained as clear as mud in the years since.

European Marijuana Seed Banks

Many of the American seed banks that offer marijuana seeds source them from a seed bank in a European country. When we bemoan the issues that cause federal and state laws to become unclear and confusing, it is important to remember that the US is effectively a continent with 50 different states and additional territories.

Europe is also a continent, and it also has more than 50 countries. The laws surrounding marijuana seeds vary according to each nation but become less confusing because they are separate states. That’s not to say that things don’t become complex!

In principle, cannabis seeds are not illegal in Europe, and it is possible to purchase seeds from another country. In general, when a product enters a European country, it becomes subject to that nation’s laws. The Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs, a 1962 framework for marijuana legalization, is an international treaty that was signed by 180 countries.

In the treaty, marijuana is classed as an illegal substance, but marijuana seeds are not illegal. As international law takes precedence over a country’s own laws, cannabis seeds are technically legal in all 180 countries. Alas, it isn’t as easy as that, and it is much safer to purchase seeds from one European country than another. Here’s a look at marijuana seed laws in a few major European nations:

  • Germany: As seeds don’t fall under the German Narcotics Act, they are technically legal to purchase. However, Germany has prohibited the sale of cannabis seeds across the nation, the only EU member state to have done so. As Germany is subject to the EU’s free movement of goods, having seeds sent to Germany is fine.
  • United Kingdom: At present, the UK allows for the purchase, sale, or trade of cannabis seeds whether you purchase them domestically or from another European nation. American buyers tend to use UK sellers such as Seedsman, who have been selling seeds globally since 2003. However, we’re not sure what will happen once the UK has left the EU. By the way, UK residents are not allowed to germinate cannabis seeds.
  • Netherlands: It is shocking to learn that despite the nation’s relaxed attitude towards marijuana, it is still illegal! However, you should have no issue purchasing cannabis seeds from a Dutch-based seed company. Companies such as Nirvana, MSNL Seeds, and Amsterdam Marijuana Seeds also enjoy good reputations.
  • France: Cannabis seeds are legal as long as they are not used for growing. However, you will struggle to find any reputable French cannabis seed dealer.
  • Spain: Spain has a similarly lenient policy as the UK. Residents can buy and sell seeds as long as they are for personal use in private areas. Shops need legal authorization to sell seeds. Alicante-based Herbie’s Seeds is a highly rated seed bank.

Types of Marijuana Seeds Available

There are three distinct types of marijuana seeds.

Regular Marijuana Seeds

These seeds come from one female and one male parent. As a result, there is a 50/50 chance that the plant will be the feminized version that carries all of those wonderful cannabinoids. As you have no control of the plant’s gender, there is a chance that you’ll waste weeks waiting for the gender to be revealed.

Feminized Marijuana Seeds

You should purchase feminized seeds instead of their regular counterparts. These seeds have no male chromosomes and are guaranteed to provide resinous bud. In other words, you don’t have to wait for a guarantee which is NOT the case with ‘regular’ seeds.

Autoflowering Marijuana Seeds

This type of seed is your best option if you want to grow your weed indoors. These seeds have genetics that evolved in northern Eurasia which means they are strong and sturdy. They are mixed with Cannabis Ruderalis, a plant known for its ability to grow in harsh weather conditions.

One of the biggest advantages of autoflowering seeds is their ability to produce a minimum of two outdoor crops. When you grow them indoors, however, you can produce four or five crops per annum. Certain strains can become mature in just ten weeks! They are heavily resistant to mold and pests and produce a much higher yield when exposed to a powerful light source.

How to Buy Cannabis Seeds Online Safely

Your safest bet is to stick to one of the reputable seedbanks outlined in this article. Look for companies that have been in the industry for a long time and have earned a significant number of positive customer reviews.

When you purchase a packet of marijuana seeds, make sure the seller explains where the seeds came from and how they were crossed or backcrossed. Don’t risk your money on seeds with no history because there’s no way of telling what you’ll end up with.

The top-rated seed banks are old hands when it comes to getting their products through customs. Some of them offer discreet shipping, which usually involves hiding the seeds in other objects. Therefore, even if a customs official opens the package, it looks like someone else.

The perfect place for seeds…

For your part, it makes sense to make a few small or medium orders. First of all, a large order could draw unwanted attention. Secondly, if one of the packages is confiscated, you won’t lose your entire order.

Finally, you could consider paying via cryptocurrency. Digital currencies such as Bitcoin leave no official record. The issue here is that the volatility of crypto means your order could become expensive in hindsight. Imagine paying in Bitcoin, only to discover that the digital currency’s value doubles in the following two weeks!

Final Thoughts on Buying Marijuana Seeds Online

As much as we would love to provide a definitive answer to the title question, we have to admit that it is complicated. You can purchase seeds within most states where growing marijuana is legal, but the issue is clouded by the fact that marijuana is federally illegal. Then there is the small matter of the nuances of state and even local law.

You should be able to purchase from seed banks in the UK and Netherlands, but make sure you do your research and find a reputable company. The last thing you want is to buy what you think are feminized seeds, only to discover that they are regular seeds capable of producing male plants!

EDITOR’S CHOICE – Homegrown CannabisCo

Homegrown CannabisCo are the masters when it comes to seeds. Offering a massive variety of cannabis seeds that are well categorized, not only does this company create a resource for superb quality options including feminized seeds, it also provides extensive growing information for those looking for some support along their journey.

Will Customs Confiscate My Cannabis Seeds?

Yes, but only if they find them! Some reputable seed banks claim that customs confiscate only 5% of their shipments. A growing number of seed banks use discreet shipping. This involves sending additional ‘gifts’ you didn’t order to conceal the seeds. You’ll receive a confiscation letter instead of the seeds if your purchase is halted at customs. However, the top-rated seed banks tend to offer a money-back guarantee if this happens.

Is It Illegal to Send Seeds in the Mail?

As cannabis is federally illegal, transporting the plant’s seeds across state lines is against the law. This is the case even if you are sending them from one adult-use state to another. However, there is little chance of getting into legal trouble. For a start, it is possible to buy them for research or collectible purposes rather than using them to grow plants.

You’re more likely to get in trouble for sending marijuana seeds from one state to another in America than sending them into the US from abroad. However, it is rare to hear of anyone getting into legal trouble for sending cannabis seeds in the mail. Usually, the worst-case scenario is that your seeds are confiscated.

Why Are Most of the Top Seed Banks International?

It is mainly due to legal issues. The world’s best seed banks are generally located in places like the Netherlands, UK, and Spain, where marijuana laws aren’t as strict as in the United States. US cannabis law means an American seed bank faces greater legal issues when sending products from one state to another than their international equivalent.

However, there are a few high-quality American seed banks, such as I Love Growing Marijuana.

Can Non-Residents Buy Seeds Online?

It is not a good idea! As marijuana is federally legal, non-residents can be deported from the United States if they have a job in a legal cannabis dispensary! Indeed, even the use of legal marijuana can result in deportation. Therefore, we would urge non-residents NOT to purchase cannabis seeds online or in a dispensary. Even if there is a relatively small chance of being caught, it isn’t worth the risk.

Is Ordering Cannabis Seeds Online Safe?

The answer is ‘yes,’ but only as long as you buy the seeds from a reputable seed bank. Apart from I Love Growing Marijuana, MSNL Seed Bank, Crop Seed Kings, and Sensi Seeds have all established a reputation for high-quality seeds. These companies provide seeds with a high germination rate and offer an excellent range of strains.

A guide to buying cannabis seeds

The first couple months of the year is a great time to start planning your cannabis garden to get a head start on the outdoor growing season, which roughly runs from March to November, depending on where you live.

Navigating the cannabis seed market can be challenging when states have different degrees of legality. This guide will answer your questions on buying seeds so you can be on your way to growing your own cannabis.

Is it legal to buy marijuana seeds?

Marijuana seeds are considered a cannabis product just like flower, edibles, and concentrates. Their legality depends on which state you live in. People living in states with adult-use legalization can buy, produce, and sell seeds within their own state, but seeds can’t cross state lines. People living in states with medical marijuana legalization can only buy seeds if they have a medical card.

Seed banks exist outside of the US and can sell them for “souvenir purposes,” but it is illegal to bring seeds into the US and Customs will seize any cannabis seeds they find in packages or on a person.

Where can I buy cannabis seeds?

Many world-renowned seed banks are overseas in the Netherlands, the UK, Spain, and other countries where cannabis laws are less restricted. Seed banks provide seeds from a variety of different breeders.

In states with adult-use legalization or a medical marijuana program, you can buy seeds within your own state, either at a dispensary or through a specific seed company’s website.

Can you buy cannabis seeds online?

Before you purchase seeds online, you’ll need to figure out what strain you want to grow and what breeder you want to buy from.

Because US federal law still prohibits cannabis, it can be hard to find information on seed banks and breeders. Breeders who have a long history and positive reputation are usually a good place to start.

Check out our explainer and buying guide to cannabis seed banks for more info on buying seeds.

To get an idea of what well-established breeders look like, check out:

Europe

  • Sensi Seeds
  • DNA Genetics
  • Dinafem
  • Green House Seeds

US

  • Southern Humboldt Seed Collective
  • Exotic Genetix

You can also do some research and find an online grow journal that details the whole growing process of a specific strain from a particular breeder. Through these, you’ll be able to look over another grower’s specific notes and see pictures of the final results.

If you grow some seeds and like the results, try growing another strain from that same breeder and see how it goes.

Do dispensaries sell cannabis seeds?

Some dispensaries in medical and adult-use states sell seeds, but not all. Be sure to check or call ahead to see if they sell seeds. Buying marijuana seeds at the dispensary is far more straightforward, however, your options will be more limited than shopping online.

Dispensary staff should be able to give you information on the seeds they’re selling, but keep in mind that a lot of dispensaries focus on selling flower and end-products. It’s a good idea to call ahead and talk to staff to see if they are knowledgeable about seeds and can give you specific information on growing.

How to look for quality genetics when buying marijuana seeds

Breeders talk about “unstable genetics,” meaning that a seed’s origin is unknown. Make sure that when you buy a packet of seeds that it or the breeder who produced them can list where the seeds came from and how they were crossed and/or backcrossed to get the seed that you hold in your hand. If you can’t get a seed’s history, it could be anything and the result of poor breeding practices.

An inexperienced breeder might cross a male and a female one time and sell the resulting seeds as a new hybrid strain, but professional breeders usually put their strains through several rounds of backcrossing to stabilize the genetics and ensure consistent plants that reflect those genetics.

Which strain should I grow?

Even one weed plant can produce a lot of buds come harvest time, so make sure you grow a strain you like. Note strains you enjoy when you pick something up at the dispensary or smoke with friends, and look for seeds of it when you want to start growing.

Some strains are easier to grow than others because they are more resistant to mold and pests, so if you’re new to growing, you may want to try an easier strain to start.

Some strains also take longer to grow than others. Depending on whether you’re growing indoors or outdoors, you may want to grow a quicker marijuana strain if you live in a climate that get cold and wet early in the season. For example, indicas are known for having a shorter flowering time than sativas.

All of this information should be available to you when buying quality seeds.

What’s the difference between regular, feminized, and autoflower seeds?

Regular seeds

If you buy a packet of regular seeds, they’ll come with a mix of males and females. A lot of cultivators prefer to grow these because they haven’t been backcrossed—essentially inbred—as much as feminized or autoflower seeds. You’ll need to sex out the seeds once their reproductive organs show during the flowering phase and discard the males—because they don’t produce buds and will pollenate females, resulting in seeded flowers.

Feminized seeds

Seeds can come feminized, meaning you can just put them in soil and start growing for buds. These seeds are guaranteed to be bud-producing females and growing them cuts out the step of having to sex out plants and discard the males.

It also reduces the risk of having a stray male sneak into your crop—just one male can pollinate a huge crop, causing your females to focus their energies on producing seeds instead of buds.

Autoflower seeds

Autoflower plants change from the vegetative to flowering state with age, not the changing of their light cycle. They have a short grow-to-harvest time and can be ready to harvest in as little as 2 ½ to 3 months from when you put the seeds in the ground. The downside is that, typically, they are less potent, but autoflower seeds are great for people who want to grow cannabis but don’t want to spend a lot of time doing it.

How much do marijuana seeds cost?

Cannabis seeds usually come in a pack of 10 or 12 seeds and start at around $40 a pack and go up from there. Some high-end genetics can run between $200 to $500 a pack.

Feminized and autoflower seeds will cost more because more breeding work was put in to creating them and they take less time for the grower to get buds.

How many seeds should I buy? Are they all going to survive?

When you grow any amount of seeds, a percentage of them won’t germinate, even if you get them from a reputable breeder. Always count on a few not germinating or dying off, or roughly 1/4 of the total you put in the ground.

When growing regular seeds, some won’t germinate and some will have to be discarded because they’ll turn out to be males. With feminized seeds, some won’t germinate, but a higher percentage of them will turn into flowering plants because there won’t be any males.

If you want six total cannabis plants to harvest for buds and are growing from regular seeds, start with about 4 times as many, or 24 seeds. Some won’t germinate and some will turn out to be males, and then you’ll want to discard down to the six best phenotypes. If growing feminized seeds, you can probably start with about twice as many seeds in this case (about 12); a couple won’t germinate, and then discard down to the six best phenotypes.

Make sure to always stay within your state’s legal limit of growing plants.

How do I buy strain-specific cannabis seeds?

Strains like Blue Dream, Gelato, and Original Glue have gained in popularity in recent years. Check out these resources on how to buy these types of cannabis seeds:

Can you get in trouble for ordering cannabis seeds in the US?

Can a potential cannabis grower get in legal trouble for ordering cannabis seeds online to the United States? Where can you safely buy marijuana seeds in the USA?

Can you get in trouble for buying marijuana seeds online?

I am not a lawyer or legal expert so please take anything I saw with a grain of salt. However, I’ve been growing since 2008 and running GrowWeedEasy.com to teach other people how to grow weed since 2010. Despite talking to literally thousands of growers who’ve ordered cannabis seeds online, I’ve never heard of a single example of someone getting in trouble with the law due to it. Not even in states where growing weed is strictly illegal, and not even as a secondhand story about someone else. It may be technically illegal to own cannabis seeds, but there don’t seem to be many prosecutions against cannabis seeds in the United States.

People rarely get in trouble for ordering cannabis seeds online.

However, that doesn’t mean there’s no risk.

You never know when it comes to the American legal system, but from what I’ve seen, your risks with ordering cannabis seeds online are typically social and involve growing as opposed to the actual ordering process. When growers get in trouble, it’s nearly always due to the wrong person finding out about the grow. Whether it’s a nosy neighbor, your plants smelling up the neighborhood, or telling someone you grow weed. But when it comes to seeds, don’t tell your friends you plan to buy seeds because if you suddenly start showing up with a ton of amazing weed they’re going to realize you’re growing it. So if you plan to order seeds online, keep it to yourself.

How to protect yourself when ordering seeds online

  • [Most Important] Order from a trusted cannabis seed bank that sells good genetics. Don’t get scammed with bad seeds or someone who takes your money and doesn’t send anything.
  • Don’t tell anyone in your life that you plan to buy cannabis seeds or grow. They will remember your words when you suddenly start overflowing with dank weed and realize you’re growing.
  • (Optional) Pay with crypto like Bitcoin or Ethereum or another anonymous payment method (I personally order with my regular bank debit card but I live in California)
  • (Optional) Order to a second home address if you have one, but this is likely unnecessary.

Where to order seeds safely in the United States?

Remember when it comes to buying seeds: Real seed businesses don’t contact you. They let you contact them. If anyone messages you to sell you seeds on social media, look out! It’s possible they will take your payment and send nothing. Always take a second to think before sending money to anyone, especially if they contact you (whether by DM, text message, phone call, email, etc.).

Recommended Marijuana Seed Sources

These sources have gotten great reviews from our readers:

    – California, United States (I Love Growing Marijuana) – California, United States – Shipped out of the UK

Seed Supreme has the best cannabis seed selection of these options. They carry many unique strains from old classics to trendy newer genetics.

The Platinum Cookies plant I’m growing now from Seed Supreme is the one pictured here in the middle. So far it’s the fastest-growing plant in the tent (check out the grow journal in progress).

Ultimate Auto has the best yields of any auto-flowering strain I’ve grown so far. This plant produced over 4 oz per plant even with only a corner of the grow tent to itself.

The biggest downside to ILGM as a seed source is their website can be difficult to navigate and find the strains you’re looking for. Their strain search is wonky and sometimes the search results are unexpected. But hey, you may find new and interesting strains that way.

MSNL Seeds was founded by a geneticist and they only carry hand-selected strains. They have a relatively small strain selection but the yields, bud quality, and plant growth are excellent. Tends to be a little cheaper than other trustworthy seed banks.

I have had amazing luck with MSNL’s autoflowering strains, like this Auto Amnesia grown in a mini tent under a 100W LED grow light.

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Shark widow seeds

Shark Widow Feminised Seeds

Shark Widow is, unsurprisingly, a cross of Great White Shark with White Widow. It is close to being a 100% indica cannabis strain and has a short flowering period which means you won’t have to wait as long for your bud.

Shark Widow is a medium-sized plant with little in the way of side-branching. Indoors its height will usually be between 75 – 90 cm. and producing yields of 300 – 400 gr/m 2 in 55 – 65 days of flowering. Outdoors it can grow as tall as 200 cm. when planted directly into the ground and northern latitude harvests will be ready by the end of September. Resin production is off the map with Shark Widow, both parents being renowned for this property, with trichomes forming all over the plant from the earliest stages of flowering.

The aroma is very powerful, pervasive and displays a sweet intensity and fruity flavour. THC production is high at 17% and the effect is both long-lasting and extremely potent giving an intense, stoned sensation. Resin production is such that this would be a good strain from which to produce extracts and concentrates.

Shark Widow

Here you can find all info about Shark Widow from Advanced Seeds. If you are searching for information about Shark Widow from Advanced Seeds, check out our Basic Infos, Shop-Finder and Price Comparison, Lineage / Genealogy, Hybrids / Crossbreeds or User Comments for this cannabis variety here at this page and follow the links to get even more information – or list all Shark Widow Strains (±2) to find a different version. If you have any personal experiences with growing or consuming this cannabis variety, please use the upload links to add them to the database!

Basic / Breeders Info

Shark Widow is an indica variety from Advanced Seeds and can be cultivated indoors (where the plants will need a flowering time of ±60 days ) and outdoors . Advanced Seeds’ Shark Widow is a THC dominant variety and is/was only available as feminized seeds.

Advanced Seeds’ Shark Widow Description

Almost 100% Indica, short flowering period, less than 60 days.
Medium size and low branching, it develops big and dense buds, with an impressive amount of resin, that is because the plant produces numerous trichome since the early days of flowering.
Powerful and aromatic, pervasive and intense sweet and fruity flavour. Longlasting and intense stoned.

Genetic: Shark x Wide Widow
Yield: 300 – 400 g/m2
THC: 17%
Indoor height: 75 – 90 cm
Outdoor height: 1,5 – 2,0 m
Indoor flowering period: From 55 to 65 days.
Harvest: Late September.

Where to buy Shark Widow cannabis seeds?

Shark Widow from Advanced Seeds is available only as feminized seeds. Regular seeds are not available at the moment. In 7 seedbanks, we found 28 offers between EUR 3.78 for 1 feminized seed and EUR 647.05 for 150 feminized seeds. If you are looking to buy Shark Widow Cannabis Seeds from Advanced Seeds somewhere – have a look to our Shark Widow Price Comparison page with all current offers from all the connected seedbanks and shops – or visit one of the following tested, trustworthy and recommended seed-shops directly to check out their current Shark Widow offers: Seedsman, Original Seeds Store, PEV Seeds Bank, Alchimia Grow Shop, Linda Seeds | Linda Semilla, Herbies Head Shop and Oaseeds.

Shark Widow

Bred by Advanced Seeds, Shark Widow crosses Shark with White Widow to create an indica powerhouse that produces big, dense buds with tremendous resin production. Expect the strain to put out a tangy yet sweet, fruity flavor. Shark Widow is a great strain for anyone looking to drop into a calming evening with a long-lasting sedative high that may put your body at ease and calm your mind.

Bred by Advanced Seeds, Shark Widow crosses Shark with White Widow to create an indica powerhouse that produces big, dense buds with tremendous resin production. Expect the strain to put out a tangy yet sweet, fruity flavor. Shark Widow is a great strain for anyone looking to drop into a calming evening with a long-lasting sedative high that may put your body at ease and calm your mind.

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Cbd weed seeds

CBD Seeds for sale

The best CBD seeds for sale are made in Delicious. These strains are perfect for all smokers who are looking for medicinal plants that do not highlight for their psychoactive effect. CBD is in fashion and so are these high CBD seeds, do you want to join the cbd cannabis seeds team?

Starting at: €8.00

Earn from 2 to 14 delicious coins.
2 coins = €0.20 and 14 coins = €1.40.

Starting at: €8.00

Earn from 2 to 14 delicious coins.
2 coins = €0.20 and 14 coins = €1.40.

Starting at: €8.00

Earn from 2 to 14 delicious coins.
2 coins = €0.20 and 14 coins = €1.40.

Starting at: €8.00

Earn from 2 to 14 delicious coins.
2 coins = €0.20 and 14 coins = €1.40.

Starting at: €48.80

Earn from 13 to 38 delicious coins.
13 coins = €1.30 and 38 coins = €3.80.

But let’s not limit ourselves. You already know that you want a therapy seed with a high percentage of CBD, but now you have to buy the one that interests you most: Feminized cbd seeds, automatic, more or less loaded with thc. I assure you that here you will acquire the CBD Seeds that you have come to look for.

High CBD seeds, which one to choose?

Rather than presenting you with an endless list of high cbd seeds, we prefer to put at your disposal the best choice taking into account what you have come to look for.

Just by taking a look at our strains you will realize that they are very different from each other. To get an idea, these cbd flower seeds come from three of the best genetics of our bank: Sugar Black Rose, Marmalate and Caramelo. They look familiar, don’t they?

Precisely for this reason, these cbd seeds for sale are a guarantee: we have developed our medical marijuana from our most successful strains. Maybe it doesn’t look good for us to say it, but. you’re playing it safe!

High CBD autoflower seeds

And if you are sure what you are looking for are high cbd autoflower seeds, we are going to make it very easy for you. The medicinal value, the particular citric taste with a touch of pepper-hash and the slight psychoactivity of the Auto Blue Ace CBD makes you go right to the safe side with this strain.

If you have been looking for an autoflowering CBD seed for a long time, give a chance to this genetic which we assure you will win you over. In addition, this strain is characterized by its psychoactive touch. Although we are talking about CBD, its slight percentage of THC makes its mental stimulation light, pleasant and subtle from the first moment.

And just in case you have arrived here with no CBD crops at all, starting with a non-photodependent strain like this one is a smart decision. You will save yourself a lot of work and worry.

CBD flower seeds, why buy it?

Choosing CBD flower seeds means opting for therapeutic marijuana. But what are the specific health benefits of this cannabidiol?

– Analgesic and ani-inflammatory
– Anticarcinogenic
– Antidepressant and antipsychotic
– Great muscle relaxant

Cannabidiol (CBD) usually has a presence of less than 1% in most strains, while in these genetics that you can find in Delicious Seeds it exceeds a percentage of 20% in many cases. Precisely from there come all these properties that we have just talked about.

In short, it is about changing the excitement and euphoria for the feeling of calm and relaxation. But, if you already know which CBD cannabis seeds you want to buy, we still have to talk about the most important thing.

CBD plant seeds, tips for growing

There is no fixed standard that you have to follow with CBD plant seeds. The strains have their own particularities, no matter what family they belong to. However, these general tips will be very helpful no matter what you choose to grow

– Keep your CBD marijuana seeds at 21° C. approximately.
– Humidity is variable: during the first weeks of growth, the humidity level should be high, whereas in the flowering phase the humidity should decrease around 50%.
– Make sure the ground is well drained and aerated. If natural soil is your thing, place some water beads to ensure proper drainage.
-Control the pH of the water and use the right fertilizers to guarantee the absorption of nutrients.

Explore our CBD weed Seeds catalogue, choose the most suitable for your crop and enjoy its many properties by buying cbd therapy seeds.

High CBD Seeds

Cannabidiol also referred to as CBD , is one of several cannabinoids found in the cannabis plant. It is the second most prevalent active compound in cannabis, is non-intoxicating, and has become the focus of considerable research for its potential therapeutic benefits.

The demand for high CBD strains has increased significantly in the last few years, leading to breeders focusing their efforts on creating high CBD strains, and growers opting for these to meet this demand. As research uncovers and validates more of CBD’s therapeutic properties, its popularity continues to be on the rise. It has become a major focus for the medical cannabis user community and is often preferred by adult users opting for a less intense cannabis experience than one dominated by THC’s intoxicating effects.

Benefits of High CBD Cannabis

High CBD products have been known for their therapeutic benefits (analgesic, anti-anxiety, and anti-inflammatory properties), making high CBD products popular among medical cannabis consumers.

Check out our pick of the highest CBD strains on our blog .

To buy high CBD cannabis seeds online, browse the best selection online below. Once you’ve made your choice, Seedsman offers discreet worldwide postage and multiple payment options.

Seeds

When we set out to make a difference on the planet through Hemp we traced it back to the seed. Our hemp feminized seeds are high-grade medical strains which provide our growers and customers with high yield CBD/low-level THC, that is compliant with federal hemp regulations. Our genetic program provides multiple high concentration CBD hemp strains for both full-season flower and auto flower genetics with the quality and consistency you expect and trust.

The Power Of Hemp

This medicinal plant inspired our business. As entrepreneurs, healers, farmers and simply as responsible citizens we see the power of this healing plant. Hemp has been cultivated in North America for over five hundred years. Historically the plant has been used primarily in textiles and foods, the passing of the Farm Bill in 2019 allows a wider range of uses and growing of this historic plant. Ventura Seed Company is dedicated to delivering an organic, high-quality product to market with a high CBD content which can be used in a variety of applications.

Hemp vs CBD vs THC

Hemp is a thriving crop that Ventura Seed Company grows legally and under USDA certified organic conditions in the states of California and New York. Hemp does not get you high, nor does CBD. High and recreational products are derived from Marijuana and its psychoactive compound, THC, which is not present in agricultural hemp. Hemp is related to Marijuana in that it comes from the same plant genus, Cannabis. Both plants look similar. Cannabis is a plant genus of which both marijuana and hemp fall under. Hemp refers to plants with a THC content of .3% or less. Our Hemp has THC levels which are virtually non-detectable. We do test via trusted third-party lab testing to ensure that is the case.

Ventura Seed Company’s Hemp is rich in CBD and we grow and cultivate it to make sure that is the case.

CBD is a known compound in the hemp flower. In the human body CBD is a helpful compound in that it acts in the human body as a regulator and supporter of the endocannabinoid system. The endocannabinoid system is what regulates stress and hormones in the body. There are few known supporters of this part of the human system in western medicine. Hemp CBD is one of them. It is often used to aid in sleep, minimize and counter the effects of stress. Ventura Seed Company offers a consistent, reliable and premium source of organic CBD.

Quality and Care

We started our business with a commitment to grow premium quality, a consistent high CBD crop with the best impact on the earth, people and the environment.

We bring forward that commitment at each step of our farming and processing, from tending to the soil, propagating seeds to caring for the crops with organic and regenerative practices.

Certifications

Hemp is a thriving crop that Ventura Seed Company grows legally and under USDA certified organic conditions in the states of California and New York. Hemp does not get you high, nor does CBD. High and recreational products are derived from Marijuana and its psychoactive compound, THC, which is not present in agricultural hemp. Hemp is related to Marijuana in that it comes from the same plant genus, Cannabis. Both plants look similar. Cannabis is a plant genus of which both marijuana and hemp fall under. Hemp refers to plants with a THC content of .3% or less. Our Hemp has THC levels which are virtually non-detectable. We do test via trusted third-party lab testing to ensure that is the case.

Ventura Seed Company’s Hemp is rich in CBD and we grow and cultivate it to make sure that is the case.

CBD is a known compound in the hemp flower. In the human body CBD is a helpful compound in that it acts in the human body as a regulator and supporter of the endocannabinoid system. The endocannabinoid system is what regulates stress and hormones in the body. There are few known supporters of this part of the human system in western medicine. Hemp CBD is one of them. It is often used to aid in sleep, minimize and counter the effects of stress. Ventura Seed Company offers a consistent, reliable and premium source of organic CBD.

For more information on organics see the robust content library from our partners at the Rodale Institute:

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Star 47 seeds

Star 47 Cannabis Seeds

Star 47 is the result of crossing the famous mainly sativa hybrid, AK 47, that has an ultra quick flowering cycle and a very fruity taste with the cup-winning champion, Sensi Star, which is a mainly indica hybrid with very broad leaves and very dense buds covered in sweet, fruity resin crystals, creating a mainly indica hybrid with a unique, sweet, fruity taste and aroma. Star 47 is a short, bushy, extremely resinous plant typical of such indica hybrids with a very short, abundant and compact flowering cycle.

Star 47 strain

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Star 47 | World of Seeds

Star 47 is the result of crossing the famous mainly sativa hybrid, AK 47, that has an ultra quick flowering cycle and a very fruity taste with the cup-winning champion, Sensi Star, which is a mainly indica hybrid with very broad leaves and very dense buds covered in sweet, fruity resin crystals, creating a mainly indica hybrid with a unique, sweet, fruity taste and aroma. Star 47 is a short, bushy, extremely resinous plant typical of such indica hybrids with a very short, abundant and compact flowering cycle.

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Plant with prickly seeds yellow flower small weed

The Only Weed Identification Guide You’ll Ever Need: 33 Common Weedy Plants to Watch For

Don’t let these pesky plants crash your garden party! The first step is to know your enemy. Then you’ll know the best way to deal with your weed problem.

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What is a Weed, Anyway?

A weed can be any plant growing where you don’t want it to. However, there are some particularly weedy species to keep an eye out for. These aggressive plants not only make your yard look messy, they can also choke out the garden plants you’ve worked so hard to grow. Whether you’re trying to identify lawn weeds or garden weeds, this handy guide will help you identify more than 30 common weeds by photo, plus give you tips for how to best remove them.

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Dandelion

Type: Broadleaf perennial

Size: 12 inches tall, 6 – 16 inches wide

Where It Grows: Lawns and gardens in sun or shade

Appearance: This common lawn weed has a long taproot; leaves are deeply notched. Yellow flowers mature into puffballs. Dandelion seeds are like parachutes that fly away in the wind, helping them invade new spaces in lawns and garden beds.

Weed Control Tips: Mulch to prevent dandelions in gardens. Pull dandelion weeds by hand or treat lawns with a broadleaf herbicide, which won’t kill grass.

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Oxalis

Type: Broadleaf perennial

Size: To 20 inches tall

Where It Grows: Sunny or shady landscape, lawn, or garden areas

Appearance: This garden weed has light green leaves that look a little like clover and cup-shape yellow flowers in summer and fall.

Weed Control Tips: Mulch garden areas in spring to prevent weeds. Pull oxalis weeds by hand or spray weeds with a broadleaf herbicide in spring or fall.

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Crabgrass

Type: Grassy annual

Size: To 18 inches tall and 20 inches wide

Where It Grows: Lawn, landscape, and garden areas in sun or shade

Appearance: Crabgrass is exactly what it sounds like: A grassy weed. This lawn weed grows roots anywhere the stem makes soil contact. Seed heads spread out like four fingers.

Control: Use a preemergence weed preventer to prevent seeds from sprouting, pull crabgrass by hand, or spot-treat with a nonselective herbicide if growing in sidewalk cracks or other places where nothing else is growing.

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Bindweed

Type: Broadleaf perennial

Size: Climbs 6 feet or more

Where It Grows: Landscape and garden areas in sun

Appearance: Identify this garden weed by its arrowhead-shape leaves on twining vines. Bindweed also produces white to pale pink morning glory-type flowers.

Control: Mulch your garden to prevent bindweed. Repeatedly pull or cut down growing bindweed plants and/or spot treat with a nonselective herbicide designed to kill roots, not just above-ground growth.

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White Clover

Type: Broadleaf perennial

Size: 8-10 inches tall, 12 inches wide

Where It Grows: Lawn, landscape, and garden areas in sun to partial shade

Appearance: White clover has three-lobe leaves and round white flower clusters. The plants quickly spread outward to form dense mats of foliage.

Control: Mulch your garden beds to prevent white clover in landscape areas. Use an iron-based herbicide to get rid of clover growing in lawns or dig out the weeds in garden beds.

Test Garden Tip: Clover adds nitrogen to the soil plus the flowers feed many pollinators so some gardeners use this plant to create a more environmentally friendly lawn.

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Nutsedge

Type: Grass-like perennial

Size: 2 feet tall, 1 foot wide

Where It Grows: Lawn, landscape, or garden areas in sun or shade

Appearance: Nutsedge has slender, grassy leaves, triangular stems, and small, nutlike tubers on the root system. When these weeds pop up in lawns, they often grow faster than turf grass, so they are easy to spot.

Control: Mulch garden areas in spring to help prevent nutsedge. Plants are easy to pull up by hand, but it will take repeated weeding to get rid of an infestation. Various herbicides are labeled for use on nutsedge in lawns but it is important to use the right one for the type of turf grass you have to avoid damaging it.

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Creeping Charlie

Type: Broadleaf perennial

Size: 4 inches tall, several feet wide

Where It Grows: Shady lawn, landscape, or garden areas

Appearance: Identify this lawn weed and groundcover by its scalloped leaves, creeping stems, and clusters of purple flowers in late spring.

Control: Mulch garden areas in spring to prevent creeping charlie. Pull plants by hand or spray with a postemergence herbicide in spring or fall.

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Lamb’s-Quarter

Type: Broadleaf annual

Size: To 4 feet tall and 18 inches wide

Where It Grows: Landscape and garden areas in sun or shade

Appearance: Lamb’s-quarter’s scalloped, triangular leaves have gray undersides.

Control: Mulch your garden to prevent lamb’s-quarter. Pull weed plants by hand or use a postemergence herbicide.

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Plantain

Type: Broadleaf perennial

Size: To 8 inches tall and 12 inches wide

Where It Grows: Moist lawn and garden areas in sun or shade

Appearance: When you’re identifying weeds in your garden, if you spot broad, flat, oval-shape leaves arranged in a low rosette, you’ve likely found a plantain.

Control: Mulch to prevent plantains growing in the garden. Pull these weeds by hand or use a postemergence herbicide in lawns.

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Dayflower

Type: Annual grass relative

Size: To 30 inches tall and wide

Where It Grows: Sunny or shady landscape areas

Appearance: Dayflowers have dark green leaves sprouting from a stem and brilliant blue flowers through the summer.

Control: Mulch the garden to prevent weeds or use a preemergence herbicide in spring. Pull weeds by hand or spot-treat with a nonselective postemergence herbicide.

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Purslane

Type: Broadleaf annual

Size: To 6 inches tall and 2 feet wide

Where it grows: Dry, sunny landscape and garden areas

Appearance: Identify this weed groundcover by its fleshy, dark green leaves and small yellow flowers at the ends of the stems.

Control: Mulch your garden to prevent purslane or use a preemergence herbicide in the spring. Pull plants by hand or spot-treat with a nonselective postemergence herbicide.

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Velvetleaf

Type: Broadleaf annual

Size: To 6 feet tall and 3 feet wide

Where It Grows: Fertile, sunny landscape and garden areas

Appearance: Velvetleaf gets its name because of its large, velvety heart-shape leaves up to 10 inches across. The weed blooms with yellow flowers in summer.

Weed Control: Mulch your garden to prevent velvetleaf or use a preemergence herbicide in spring. Pull existing plants by hand or use a postemergence herbicide.

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Wild Violet

Type: Broadleaf perennial

Size: 6 inches tall, 6 inches wide

Where It Grows: Shady lawn, landscape, or garden areas

Appearance: Wild violet is a groundcover with heart-shape leaves and purple flowers in late spring.

Control: Mulch garden beds in spring to prevent wild violet. Pull weeds by hand or spray with a postemergence herbicide in spring or fall.

Test Garden Tip: This plant is sometimes grown as an ornamental in shade gardens.

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Smartweed

Type: Broadleaf annual

Size: To 42 inches tall and 30 inches wide

Where It Grows: Sunny landscape and garden areas

Appearance: Identify garden weeds like smartweed by its lance-shape leaves often marked with purple chevrons. It’s an upright plant with pink or white flowers in summer and fall.

Control: To prevent this weed, mulch garden beds in spring. Pull plants by hand or apply a postemergence herbicide once it grows.

Test Garden Tip: This weed is native to areas of North America. Unlike many exotic weeds, it does support local wildlife.

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Quickweed

Type: Broadleaf annual

Size: To 2 feet tall and wide

Where It Grows: Sunny landscape and garden areas

Appearance: Quickweed has jagged, hairy leaves and small white daisy-shape flowers in summer.

Control: Use a mulch or a preemergence herbicide in spring to prevent quickweed. If plants do grow, pull them by hand or spot-treat them with a postemergence herbicide.

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Pigweed

Type: Broadleaf annual

Size: 6 feet tall, 2 feet wide

Where it grows: Sunny landscape or garden areas

Appearance: Pigweeds are tall plants with a taproot. Identify weeds by their hairy-looking clusters of green flowers (though some varieties are grown as annuals).

Control: Mulch garden areas in spring to prevent pigweed or use a preemergence herbicide in spring. Pull weeds by hand or spray with a postemergence weed killer.

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Canada Thistle

Type: Broadleaf perennial

Size: To 6 feet tall and 3 feet wide

Where It Grows: Sunny lawn, landscape, or garden areas

Appearance: Canada thistle has spiny, gray-green leaves and purple flowers.

Control: Mulch your garden to prevent it in landscape areas. Use a postemergence herbicide in lawns in spring or fall, or dig the weed out by hand.

Test Garden Tip: Thistle has an extensive root system that can grow several feet out from the main plant.

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Knotweed

Type: Broadleaf annual

Size: To 8 inches tall and 2 feet wide

Where It Grows: Sunny or partly shaded lawn, landscape, or garden areas

Appearance: Knotweed is an invasive groundcover with blue-green leaves sparsely appearing on long stems.

Control: Prevent knotweed with a deep layer of mulch or apply a preemergence herbicide in spring. Once the plant grows, hand-pull or spot-treat it with a nonselective weed killer.

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Pokeweed

Type: Broadleaf perennial

Size: To 10 feet tall and 2 feet wide

Where It Grows: Sunny landscape or garden areas

Appearance: Identify this garden weed by its light green leaves, clusters of white flowers, and dark purple berries.

Control: Prevent pokeweed with a deep layer of mulch. Once the plant grows, hand-pull or spot-treat it with an herbicide.

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Poison Ivy

Type: Broadleaf perennial

Size: To 15 feet tall and wide

Where It Grows: Sunny or shady landscape or garden areas

Appearance: Poison ivy can be a vine, shrub, or groundcover. The weed has leaves divided into three leaflets and can sprout clusters of green berries.

Control: Prevent poison ivy with a deep layer of mulch. If the weed starts to grow in your yard, spot-treat it with an herbicide or wrap your hand in a plastic bag, pull the plant up, roots and all, and carefully invert the plastic bag around the plant, seal, and throw away.

Test Garden Tip: The plant contains oils that cause a severe allergic skin reaction in many people when touched. These oils are present even on dead leaves and can become airborne and inhaled if the plant is burned.

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Weeds With Flowers: 41 Flowering Weeds With Pictures

Did you find a weed with flowers in your yard, but aren’t quite sure what it is? It’s important to understand about weeds and if that type is harmful or beneficial to your garden goals. In this article, we examine the most common weeds with flowers to help you identify what stays and what needs to be relocated.

By Jason White Last updated: March 23, 2022 | 26 min read

If you’re here, you likely have an unwanted case of weeds with flowers on your hands, or you’re curious about the beautiful weed-like flower growing harmlessly in your backyard. In either case, a weed is really just a native plant that’s growing where you don’t want it to. Flowering weeds can attract pollinators, and can even be beneficial to your garden.

It’s important to note, we are pollinator friendly here at this site! We don’t advocate you removing weeds with herbicides. But there are circumstances where certain weeds may be dangerous to touch or can cause harm to your gardening goals. So in these circumstances, we recommend relocation, while understanding this isn’t always possible.

In this guide, we identify the many different types of flowering weeds you are likely to encounter in your yard, with pictures to help you identify each of them. Let’s take a look at the most common flowering weeds that may pop up so you can decide which ones are harmless and can stay, and which ones should go.

Bindweed

Scientific name: Convolvulus arvensis

Bindweed resembles morning glories, with 2-inch trumpet-shaped flowers in white and pink varieties. Sometimes, the flowers come with pink and white stripes. Its flowers bloom in the mid-summer and tend to remain until the fall.

But before its flowers appear, you’ll first notice bindweed vines growing over open land or up any object they come across. They have arrow-shaped leaves and latch tightly to their hosts by wrapping their thin vines tightly around them.

Should you want to intentionally plant bindweed, find dried-out pods on a plant in the wild. Then, crack the pod open and plant the seeds it contains in the fall.

Bindweed grows best in hedges and the outskirts of woods that receive full sun. It has a USDA hardiness of 4 – 8, with this perennial climber growing over six feet in ideal conditions.

Black Medic

Scientific name: Medicago lupulina

You may mistake black medic as a clover at first, given the heart-shaped nature of its leaves, which grow in groups of three. However, the most notable difference is that black medic is a weed that has yellow flowers instead of white ones.

During the summer, a stem emerges erect from each group of leaves, and small yellow flowers appear that collectively look like pom-poms.

Black medic thrives in tightly compacted soil, such as walkways through your garden and roadsides. It also doesn’t need much organic material, so its presence in your garden is a sign that your soil may need amending.

The plant prefers full or partial sun and neutral or acidic soil. It can handle conditions from coastlines to mountainsides. Black medic can grow in many climates within USDA zones 3a – 9a.

Black Nightshade

Scientific name: Solanum nigrum

The words “black nightshade” might give you the shivers because it contains the toxin solanine. It’s not safe for consumption for humans, or pets. Black nightshades make this list of weeds with flowers because of their white flowers that bloom starting in late spring.

They continue producing flowers until September and grow about two feet high and one foot wide. As a hermaphrodite, each plant contains male and female organs. Therefore, they rely on insects to pollinate their flowers.

Black nightshades have a high tolerance for less-than-ideal growing conditions. They do well in sandy, loamy, and clay soil. That said, wherever they grow needs good drainage and lots of sunlight. Black nightshades grow in USDA zones 10a – 11.

Canada Thistle

Scientific name: Cirsium arvense

Canada thistle is a weed that extends outside of the great white north. It has an extensive root system that makes it challenging for the average person to prevent the plant from regrowing. This weed’s purple flowers emerge from this plant in the late spring or early summer.

The flowers have a sweet smell, encouraging insects to pollinate the 1,000 – 1,500 seeds it has on each flowering shoot. Canada thistle seeds have impressive hardiness, withstanding water transportation and surviving up to 22 years underground before germinating.

The Canada thistle needs abundant sunlight and cool, well-aerated soil to thrive. It also needs lots of rain—you’ll find it in areas that receive 17 – 35 inches of annual precipitation.

Under these conditions, a single Canada thistle plant can colonize up to six diameters of space within two years. It grows in USDA zones 3a – 10b.

Cat’s Ear

Scientific name: Hypochaeris radicata

Cat’s ear is known for its brilliant yellow flowers that contain several layers of petals, resembling a flatter version of a dandelion. The flowers grow from thin, wiry stems and emerge from May to September. They have tiny hairs on their leaves, and you can even eat those leaves in salad.

Once you see cat’s ear pop up in your lawn or garden, you can expect these perennials to sow their seeds well so that they return every year. They tend to grow best where there’s grass, making it even more important for you to weed your garden regularly if you don’t want them there.

Cat’s ear prefers wet environments and holds up relatively well in soil with salt. Therefore, you may find them growing around swamps and salt lakes.

The self-sowing cat’s ear thrives in USDA zones 3a – 11.

Chickweed

Scientific name: Stellaria media

Chickweed is an annual flowering weed. It grows tiny white flowers in the early to mid-spring. The flower petals have a small, natural split on the tip of each end. The flowers only grow to about one centimeter in diameter.

If you look closely, you’ll notice yellow, green, or red anthers emerging from its green ovary. Like its stems, chickweed’s flower stalks have a fine layer of hair. Chickweed grows best in moist soil and partial shade. If you’re not trying to grow this weed, you’ll likely find it popping up under your bushes or tall vegetation.

It isn’t picky about the soil it grows in as long as it stays moist while simultaneously having decent drainage. Chickweed grows in USDA zones 4 – 11.

Chicory

Scientific name: Chicorium intybus

Chicory is an erect, straggly weed that takes over many roadsides in the summer with its pretty periwinkle-colored flowers. The flowers remain until the first frost. They grow about 1.5 inches in diameter and cluster in groups of one two five along a turdy branch.

The short-lived chicory flowers only bloom for a day. Furthermore, if they’re in a cooler climate, the flower will stay open all day. But in hot climates, they’ll only emerge in the morning.

Interestingly, it’s challenging to find chicory in natural landscapes that humans haven’t touched. Instead, it prefers the disturbed land of roads, wastelands, and pastures.

Chicory prefers temperatures between 45 – 75 degrees Fahrenheit. It likes well-drained soil, but the ground itself doesn’t need to be of outstanding quality. Chicory grows in USDA zones 3 – 9.

Common Chickweed

Scientific name: Stellaria media

The cold-loving common chickweed is one of the many weeds with flowers on this list that you can eat. They contain small white flowers with lobed petals, although some may not have any petals. The center of the flowers usually contains three each of stamens and styles, typically yellow or orange in color.

In cold climates, the chickweed is an annual plant. But in warmer areas, it becomes a perennial evergreen. Its thin stems can grow up to 16 inches, although they’re flimsy and break easily.

Chickweed has small, sporadic hairs on its stems. It has oval leaves that cascade opposite one another down the stalk.

Chickweed thrives in moist soil with full sun or partial shade. It’ll still flower in less-than-ideal conditions, but it’ll do so at a shorter height. Chickweed grows in USDA zones 4 – 11.

Common Evening Primrose

Scientific name: Oenothera biennis

The common evening primrose causes much debate over whether it’s a weed, for it has gorgeous yellow flowers that produce a lemony aroma. That said, the flowers open in the evening and close by mid-day, so you’ll have to be a night owl to enjoy them for longer.

Each common evening primrose flower contains four petals and is two inches in diameter. The plant is massive, growing up to six feet high with long, thin leaves growing from a basal rosette.

Contrary to many weeds, the common evening primrose takes two years to finish its life cycle, as it doesn’t flower until its second year. The evening primrose prefers to grow in rocky and sandy soil. It can handle any amount of sun or shade, but it prefers an average amount of rain with dry soil moisture. It grows in USDA zones 4 – 9.

Common Ragworts

Scientific name: Jacobaea vulgaris, syn

Brilliant yellow flowers are iconic of the common ragwort. They flower for the entire summer and more, starting in mid-June and dropping their petals in November. In order to bloom, this plant must have undergone cold weather exposure.

Furthermore, the common ragwort must reach a large enough size to produce flowers, which can sometimes take them over three years. Each flower produces approximately 70 seeds per head, with one plant able to release around 150,000 seeds.

Common ragworts thrive in sandy soil, as sand dunes are their natural habitat. However, you can also find this weed in grasslands and soil with few nutrients—the worse the soil for planting, the happier the common ragwort since it’ll have less competition.

You’ll find common ragwort growing in USDA zones 4 – 8, and they don’t have specific pH requirements to thrive.

Common Self-Heal

Scientific name: Prunella vulgaris

It’s “common” to encounter the common self-heal plant intertwined with grass. During the months of June to September, it produces brilliant violet, pink, or white flowers. These flowers grow erect, with petals emerging from a single center.

Starting in August, common self-heal’s seeds start ripening. They have a high chance of survival, given that they grow well in sandy, loamy, and clay soils with mild acidy to mild alkalinity.

Common self-heal is among the problematic weeds with flowers to combat in gardens because it needs space to sprawl where it’ll have access to full sun or partial shade—in other words, the footpaths through your garden.

It likes soil that remains moist but drains well and avoids the shade of taller plants. Common self-heal grows in USDA zones 3 – 7.

Common St. John’s Wort

Scientific name: Hypericum perforatum

The European native common St. John’s wort is a household recognized name because of its anti-depression property. It contains deep yellow flowers with dozens of stamen that emerge around a lighter yellow center.

For ideal flower production, common St. John’s wort requires a balance between shade and sun. If the sun hits its leaves too long, leaf scorch will set in; too little sun, and it’ll reduce its flower output.

St. John’s wort will grow in practically any soil condition, from rocky to loam. As for pH, it can handle acidic to moderately alkaline earth. If you live in an area with occasional flooding, you’ll likely see Common St. John’s wort around, as it holds up well. Common St. John’s wort thrives in USDA zones 5 – 10.

Creeping Buttercups

Scientific name: Ranunculus repens

Glossy, yellow petals are iconic of the creeping buttercup. Its flowers often have five, although sometimes ten, petals. They emerge from thin stalks, with a single flower on the top of each of these petioles.

Creeping buttercups bloom from March to August. Although they can be an attractive plant to cover ditches on countryside roads, it has a rapid growth rate. A single plant can cover more than a 40 square foot space in one year.

Creeping buttercups love wet areas. Well-irrigated lawns, fields, and swampy areas are some of the common areas where you’ll encounter this plant. To make things worse, it’s toxic to animals that consume it.

One of the iconic features of the creeping buttercup is its ability to live in viable soil. It can remain in acidic or water-saturated conditions for 80 years before germinating. Creeping buttercups grow in USDA zones 3 – 8.

Creeping Speedwell

Scientific name: Veronica filiformis

Creeping speedwell is a weed that some people use as an aesthetic groundcover, given the bluish-purple and white flowers that it produces from April to July. It grows especially well between rocks, so this can be a problem plant if you’re trying to keep a clean look.

The creeping speedwell only grows 2 – 3 inches high, but a single plant can spread up to 29 inches. Its leaves vary in color from light green to gray-green, depending on the amount of sun it receives.

Creeping speedwells prefer sandy or loamy soils with a neutral pH and plenty of water. They’re fast-growing, bouncing back quickly after medium foot traffic.

Creeping speedwells grow in USDA zones 4 – 8, with tolerance for zone 9 if it has access to some shade.

Daisy Weeds

Scientific name: Bellis perennis

If you have the daisy weed pictured as having bright white petals and a yellow pom-pom center, you’re spot on. While these flowers are attractive in areas where you want them, daisies are weeds with flowers that spread wildly.

Their flowers range from 1 – 1.5 inches in diameter, and they have broad leaves up to 2.5 inches long. The tops of daisy weed leaves have a series of small, harmless spikes.

Garden walls, cracks in paving, and rock crevices are some of the many places where you’ll encounter wild daisy weeds. They grow well in compacted soil where other plants can’t thrive. Even in more fertile soil, daisy weeds create a thick mat, suffocating other plants.

Daisy weeds spread extra quickly in their preferred growing conditions of moist soil and full sun. They grow in USDA zones 4 – 8.

Dandelions

Scientific name: Taraxacum

Dandelions are perhaps the most classic example of weeds with flowers on this list. They contain a flower head of bright yellow ray flowers. The outer bracts point down, with the remaining petals facing up.

The dandelion produces flowers from March to September. Then, as fall approaches, its petals drop to reveal spherical seeds that the wind carries.

Perhaps to the surprise of the average gardener, dandelions have many uses, including eating the baby leaves in salads and using the white liquid in their stalks as glue.

Dandelions prefer growing in disturbed (cultivated) ground with access to lots of sunlight. They grow up to 28 inches tall in soils with a pH between 3 – 9 and when they’re out of the path of lawn mowers. Dandelions grow in USDA zones 3 – 9.

Dayflower

Scientific name: Commelina communis

The dayflower is a weed that produces an intricate periwinkle-colored flower that ranges from .5 – 1-inch wide. It only has three petals—two larger periwinkle ones and one small white one. But it doesn’t end there. The dayflower has three long white sepals and five or six yellow stamens that make it look like an exotic tropical plant.

These flowers stay in blossom for about one to two months during the mid-summer to early fall. When the dayflower isn’t in bloom, it has glossy deep green leaves that have a slightly upward curl.

Despite its beauty, the dayflower is an aggressive grower, which is why people consider it a weed. It likes loamy or somewhat sandy soil and full or partial sun.

Daylilies need moist or semi-most water to thrive. They grow in USDA zones 5b – 8a.

Fleabane

Scientific name: Erigeron sp.

Some people call fleabanes the eastern daisy fleabane, given that it looks like a miniature version of a daisy. It has an outer layer of white florets and smaller inner disc florets attached to a yellow center. The flowers emerge in the summer, and they may have an additional bloom in the fall.

The fleabane’s stem usually contains several stalks with a single flower attached to each branch. These stalks have tiny, soft hairs.

Fleabanes grow fibrous roots which can turn into a taproot if you give them enough time. It loves open, sunny areas. However, it usually finds the least amount of competition in poor-quality soil. You’ll encounter fleabanes in soil ranging from acidic to alkaline. They grow in USDA zones 5 – 9.

Giant Hogweed

Scientific name: Lamium purpureum

Giant hogweed has a similar appearance to Queen Anne’s lace (which we’ll cover further down), except it grows up to 15 feet tall compared to four feet. It contains a mass of tiny white flowers that form a single, slightly upward-turned flower look.

The giant hogweed produces flowers in June and July, with each flower mass reaching up to 60 centimeters in diameter. In the fall, the flower gives way to flat but oval-shaped seeds.

Although giant hogweed can turn heads, avoid touching it with your bare skin. Its sap can cause burns, scarring, and even blindness if you get it in your eyes.

Giant hogweed can grow in just about any space, from ravines to creekbanks to woods. They take up residence in nearly any soil type they can dig their roots into. Giant hogeweed grows in USDA zones 3a to 9b.

Goldenrod

Scientific name: Solidago sp.

The thought of goldenrods might have you sneezing, but when you have it under control, this weed with fluffy yellow flowers allures bees and butterflies to gardens to pollinate your crops.

A goldenrod’s flowers bloom in the late summer and fall. It has long branches where tiny yellow flowers form with tips of deep orange. Despite their attractive appearance, goldenrods are weeds because of their invasive nature and because they usually don’t have flowers for most of the year.

Goldenrods will take up home in just about any area they can. They don’t have a strong preference for soil type, and they’ll happily lap up water while also being able to handle prolonged droughts.

Perhaps unfortunate for your garden, it’s uncommon for pests or diseases to wipe out a group of goldenrods. They grow in USDA zones 3 – 9.

Groundsel

Scientific name: Senecio vulgaris

Groundsels have small yellow flowers that stay open for much of the year. As they prepare to seed, they drop their petals and turn fluffy and white, much like a dandelion.

Although the groundsel’s flowers look like single entities from afar, up close, you’ll notice they have a composite head, with many small flowers clustered together.

The groundsel grows up to 18 inches tall with alternating leaves that have coarse but harmless teeth, diving the foliage into lobes. A taproot that grows close to the surface holds it in place with the support of secondary fibrous roots.

It’s common to spot groundsel growing along roads, around landfills, and cracks in your cement. It can grow in just about any soil, although it prefers soil ground. Groundsels grow in USDA zones 3 – 9.

Hairy Bittercress

Scientific name: Cardamine hirsuta

Hairy bittercresses are ground weeds that show their faces in April and May when small white flowers pop up around their round green leaves. They belong to the mustard family, and as such, they set out on a fast-growing spree once their seeds germinate.

While we’re on the topic of seeds, the hair bittercress’ flowers change into long seedpods as they near the end of their life cycle. These seedpods then burst when they become dry, using wind to disperse them.

Hairy bittercress enjoys cool and moist soil, making this a weed you’ll likely have to battle in the spring. A deep taproot makes it challenging to uproot this plant permanently.

You may find hairy bittercress growing under and around your garden plants in USDA zones 4 – 8.

Henbit

Scientific name: Lamium amplexicaule

The henbit is both a weed and an herb, as you can use its flowers, stem, and leaves in tea. Although it belongs to the mint family, this plant tastes closer to kale.

Henbits produce small deep pink elongated flowers in the upper circular parts of their leaf axils. They have an orchid-like appearance, showcasing a white face and red flecks. Nevertheless, this plant is a weed because it spreads quickly, helped by its ability to grow roots from its stems that touch the ground.

Wrinkle-like leaves are a characteristic of henbits because of their recessed upper veins. The plant has a thick stem but doesn’t grow higher than 30 centimeters.

The henbit’s favorite soil is well-tilled and dry. It, therefore, enjoys growing in fields and gardens, but you can also find it in waste areas. Henbits grow in USDA zones 4 – 8.

Herb Bennet

Scientific name: Geum urbanum

The herb bennet grows small yellow flowers between the months of May and August. The 5-petal flowers droop shortly after emerging. What follows are spiny seed heads. They have red hooks on their ends, making them cling to passing animals and humans.

Needless to say, herb bennets are one of the weeds with flowers that you really don’t want growing nearby. However, some people use herb bennet leaves and roots as a spice for soup.

These weeds love shady areas, as they often live in woods, hedgebanks, and under scrub. They also require nutrient-rich soil to thrive and a decent amount of water in a well-draining area. Herb bennets are self-fertile and like just about any range of soil pH. These plants live in USDA zones 5 – 9.

Herb Robert

Scientific name: Geranium robertianum

Herb Robert produces bright pink flowers in wooded areas during the spring and summer. Its leaves and stems are naturally green. But if this plant has too much access to the sun, it turns red and develops dark spots.

As its name implies, Herb Robert is more than a weed; it’s an herb that people use as an antiseptic and insect repellent. Although funguses can sometimes plague this plant, overall, it’s a hardy species that can outlive many other plants around it.

Herb Roberts grow as tall as 20 inches when they’re in moist and darkly lit conditions. They often sprout between cracks in rocks and produce small red fruits.

These herbs thrive in nitrogen-rich soil but die if they’re in a wet area for too long. Herb Robert grows in USDA zones 5 – 9.

Jimsonweed

Scientific name: Datura stramonium

Jimsonweed is in the nightshade family with a fragrant trumpet-shaped flower on each of its forked branches. The colors of its petals range from white to cream to violet. Perhaps unsurprisingly for those familiar with nightshades, this weed’s flowers open at night.

You can find Jimsonweed growing along roads and in feces-ridden pastures in just about any part of the world with a warm climate. It also goes well growing around landfills.

Jimsonweed contains poisonous properties, although people consume it for its psychoactive properties. It has the greatest amount of toxin before flowering; after that time, it becomes relatively safer.

Sunny and partly shaded areas are ideal for Jimsonweed. It can grow in most soil types, including calcareous and clay loam, but it prefers earth that remains dry. Jimsonweed grows in USDA zones 6 – 9.

Lesser Celandine

Scientific name: Ficaria verna

Lesser Celandine is in the buttercup family. So, it has glossy yellow petals and a star-shaped design. Each flower contains 8 – 12 petals. Its leaves also have a shiny appearance with a heart-like shape that sits on long stalks.

The low-growing lesser celandine flowers from January to April, but its leafy greens appear in the fall and winter. You can find it in gardens, woodlands, and grasslands. Damp areas are paramount to this weed. So, it also congregates along stream banks and ditches.

Unlike many weeds, lesser celandine has specific growing requirements. It doesn’t do well in dry areas, requires shade, and needs basic to alkaline soil.

Lesser celandine is a fast-growing plant, thanks to its underground runners and tubers. Therefore, it’s quick to invade garden edges and the shaded areas your plants provide. Lesser celandine grows in USDA zones 4 – 8.

Marestail

Scientific name: Erigeron canadensis

Marestail, or horseweed, is an annual weed that grows in an erect fashion. It gets its name because it has a single central stem where leaves grow out of, forming a bushy “tail” of up to seven feet high.

Several flowers emerge on the branches at the top of this plant during the late spring. Its small, white flowers house thousands of minuscule seeds that’ll disperse through wind and the end of the season.

Although many horseweed plants die after dispersing their seeds, over half manage to survive the winter. Seeds usually sprout quickly versus having dozens of years of longevity like some other weeds.

Marestail loves coarse and well-draining soil. Preferably, the soil should be loamy or with high organic content. Although it appreciates a decent amount of water, it can withstand drought. Marestail flourishes in USDA zones 3 – 11.

Meadow Death Camas

Scientific name: Zygadenus venenosus

Meadow death camas are among the poisonous weeds with flowers that we’re covering here. They have attractive white flowers with yellow centers, with multiple small flowers forming a triangular-shaped head at the top of its stalks.

The meadow death camas have long stamens that add to their delicate design. They bloom from April to July and have grass-like leaves that grow in an upward v-shape from the ground. So, when they’re not in bloom, it’s easy to mistake them for high-growing grass.

You’ll find meadow death camas growing in mostly dry climates. They do well on hillsides, sagebrush slopes, and in meadows that receive little rain.

Because of its toxins, the mining bee is the only known insect that can pollinate the meadow death camas. It grows in USDA zones 8a – 11a.

Milkweed

Scientific name: Asclepias sp.

Any child who grew up in the countryside where milkweed grows knows that this weed releases a sticky white milk-like liquid when you snap its stem. It’s an extremely fragrant plant, attracting insects of all kinds for feasting and pollination.

Milkweed produces flowers in several colors, including pink, purple, green, and orange. Many tiny flowers cluster together at the top of its 2 – 5-foot stalk, creating a ball-shaped appearance.

Its large, green leaves make it a favorite spot for monarch butterflies to lay their eggs beneath. When the larvae hatch, they feed on the plant’s foliage.

Milkweed loves lots of sunlight and can hold up well in most soil conditions. That said, there are some species, such as swamp milkweed, that need damp, fertile earth to survive. Milkweed grows in USDA zones 3 – 9.

Nettle

Scientific name: Urtica dioica

You may not look at the nettle and see flowers right away, but this perennial flowering plant contains many small green to brown-colored flowers. The flowers remain in bunches along the length of its stem.

The nettle’s leaves contain lots of small hairs. Although this particular species isn’t poisonous, some species contain toxins in their hairs that can create painful stings if they break off onto your skin. In either case, having a run-in with nettles can be painful.

Nettles require soil with high nitrogen levels. They prefer partial shade and well-aerated soil with a pH ranging from 5.0 – 8.0.

It’s common to encounter nettle on the edges of fields and along pastures, where it can cause issues for livestock. Nettle grows in USDA zones 3 – 10.

Oxalis

Scientific name: Corniculata

The oxalis is a weed with attractive 5-petal flowers. The colors vary from white to pink to red and yellow. Regardless of the base color, oxalises have many stripes running from their center to the tips of their petals.

It contains 3 – 10+ leaflets resembling clover leaves that attach to a woody stem. Oxalises are sensitive to light, so they may adjust their leaf angle to avoid excessive amounts of sunlight.

The leaf color of Oxalises can vary from deep shamrock green to maroon. As such, some people use this weed for decorative purposes, although potting it is best given its fast-spreading nature.

Oxalises prefer partial shade and well-draining, organic soil. If they get too hot during the summer, they’ll drop their leaves. These weeds grow best in USDA zones 7 – 10.

Pokeweed

Scientific name: Phytolacca americana

Pokeweed is a plant that has some medicinal properties, but its main draw is its red berry that people use to make ink and red food coloring. Nevertheless, it’s not a plant you likely want around your property—it can grow up to ten feet high.

The flowers of pokeweed look different from average. They have pink-colored racemes with usually white to green flowers via their five sepals, although they don’t have true petals. The flowers then turn into purplish-black berries that form this iconic-looking plant.

Pokeweed prefers sunny areas, so it grows in fields and around forest edges. The flowers occur from May to October in cooler climates and year-round in warmer areas.

Unfortunately for those with acidic soil, pokeweed will happily grow in soil with a pH as low as 4.7. It grows in zones 4 – 8, including neutral to slightly alkaline soils.

Queen Anne’s Lace

Scientific name: Daucus carota

Queen Anne’s lace is a weed with flowers that live up to their name; they have tightly grouped white flowers that come together with small spaces of air between them, resembling lace. If you leave Queen Anne’s lace untouched, they’ll produce these flowers starting in their second year.

Furthermore, Queen Anne’s lace is tall, waving its flat-topped flowers up to four feet in the air. Its leaves also have a pleasant appearance for a weed, as they have the long, narrow leafy appearance of ferns.

When seeded in open areas, Queen Anne’s lace spreads wildly. It enjoys growing in fields and other sunlit spaces.

Although this weed will grow in practically any soil, it prefers well-draining soil with neutral or alkaline soil. Queen Anne’s lace grows in USDA zones 3 – 9.

Quickweed

Scientific name: Galinsoga parviflora

You can’t tell that quickweed is part of the sunflower family by looking at its flower, but that’s exactly what it is. It contains a small, round yellow center with five tiny white petals surrounding it. Each petal has space between it, and they seem disproportionately small compared to this weed’s center.

Quickweed appears in gardens early in the summer and has a shallow root system. So, they’re easy to weed. However, they’re excellent seed spreaders, so it’s challenging to combat quickweed once it’s there.

You can eat quickweed’s fuzzy leaves with salad, and some people also use it for medicinal purposes—most notably, nettle stings.

Quickweed enjoys partial sunlight and northward-facing slopes. They prefer moderately dry areas with 400 – 800 mm of annual rain. Quickweed grows best in USDA zone 9.

Rosebay Willowherb

Scientific name: Chamaenerion angustifolium

The rosebay willowherb won’t strike you as resembling a willow, but it does have a tall, wispy nature, with its grassy leaves growing up to 1.5 meters. It produces alluring pinkish-purple flowers from June to September.

Rosebay willowherbs are a weed because of their ability to quickly take over open spaces, rapidly growing tightly together so that they block out other plant competition. You can find them at the edges of forests, grasslands, and wasteland.

To grow their leaves that spiral upwards around their stem, the rosebay willowherb needs a combination of sun and shade with dry or moist soil.

Rosebay willowherbs aren’t picky about soil type; you can find them in sandy, loamy, and clay soils. They also grow well in various soil pH, from mildly acidic to slightly alkaline. They grow in USDA zones 3 – 7.

Silverbush

Scientific name: Convolvulus cneorum

Field bindweed has attractive trumpet-shaped white flowers that begin with pink buds. These weeds with flowers bloom from the spring to the summer. Field bindweeds love hot and dry summers, as they’re native to the Mediterranean. It’s also when they maximize their seed production.

Because of their intricate root system, field bindweeds have an excellent tolerance for drought. They can also manage to grow in tightly packed or tilled land.

Nevertheless, their ideal conditions are fertile soil that drains well. It’s common to see these weeds growing along the sides of roads and in pastures.

Field bindweed is an evergreen shrub that grows up to more than three feet high. It thrives in USDA zones 8a – 10b.

Smartweed

Scientific name: Polygonum sp.

Smartweed is an attractive weed if you don’t mind where it’s growing, for it has a series of pinkish-white flowers that sit tightly on top of each other, following the topmost 1.5-inch part of its stalk. Instead of petals, these flowers have sepals that give them a petal appearance.

You can expect the smartweed you encounter to grow upwards of six feet tall, although the flowers and leaves might start bending under their own weight as they grow. They differ from knotweeds, which have a similar appearance but with flowers clustered around their leaf axils.

The smartweed produces flowers from June to November. Often, the outer side of the sepal is a deeper pink, and the inner side is whiter once it opens.

Smartweed loves growing in wet areas, including along streambeds, wetlands, and ditches. They prefer rich soil and grow in USDA zones 3a – 10b.

Wild Clovers

Scientific name: Trifolium repens

Wild clovers are an iconic weed that flowers with its pom-pom purplish-white flower emerging on single stalks in grassy areas. It grows up to 40 centimeters tall, and you can spot its flower from May to October.

Although most weeds on this list aren’t something you want around your garden, the wild clover may change your mind. It contains a high amount of nitrogen, improving local soil quality where it grows.

It’s common to spot wild clovers in drought-prone areas, as they don’t need much water to survive. Furthermore, they hold up well in both full sun or partial shade, so they’ll sometimes overtake other weeds.

Wild clovers can grow in practically any soil type, and they hold up well even during trampling, to the dismay of a gardener. It grows in USDA zones 3 – 10.

Wild Multiflora Roses

The multiflora rose is a wild rose, and considered invasive due to being imported and spreading unchecked.

Scientific name: Rosa sp.

Wild roses may not seem appropriate in an article about weeds with flowers, but these roses don’t have the beautiful silky cups that you’d give your partner. Instead, they have five petals that splay out in an almost flat shape.

As a result, you can see this flower’s yellowish-white center. Wild rose petals vary in color, but most have a pink and white mixture. They also have spines on their thick, woody stalks, just like modern-day (grafted) roses. These plants are imports from overseas and are considered quite invasive.

Wild rose bushes grow in sunny areas with well-draining soil, although there’s a variety of this species called the swap rose that does well in wet conditions. When they grow too closely together, diseases can set in since airflow is crucial to keeping them healthy.

Of course, you may not want these plants to stick around, given that their woody bases can be tough to remove. Wild roses grow in USDA zones 3 – 8.

Wild Violets

Wild violets are usually not offensive, despite being considered a weed. They are commonly used for groundcover.

Scientific name: Viola odorata

Like wild roses, wild violets are the original, non-grafted version of the violet most people grow in their gardens. They’re a fast-growing plant that quickly spreads its seeds, making wild violets a weed in many gardeners’ and homeowners’ eyes.

Most wild violets have purple flowers with a white, hairy interior. However, some of these flowers may have yellow or white exteriors.

Wild violets flourish in woody areas and along stream banks. They like rich organic soil and moisture without being in standing water. If wild violets grow in an area with a lot of sunlight, they’ll drop their flowers to survive. These weeds grow in USDA zones 3 – 9.

Final Thoughts

What’s a weed to one person may be another’s treasure. After all, someone had the foresight to turn wild roses and violets into the refined flowers we enjoy in our gardens today.

The ball is in your court now that you know how to identify common weeds with flowers. If you have a poisonous weed growing on your property, removing it is a no-brainer. But if you enjoy the flowers on harmless weeds in your backyard, you just might want to start calling them a “plant” instead of a “weed.”